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I really wonder, which specific structure should be suitable according to the table below for the following sentence:

The table shows that navigation is included or not included in related cars.

Or

The table shows that navigation is included or not in related cars.

The table:

         Navigation
| BMW  |    1
| Opel |    -

I want to use not because Opel has no any navigation feature.

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Usually navigation is a non-count noun. –  snailplane Feb 28 at 11:21
    
Thank you @snailplane I will edit my post then –  Hakan Feb 28 at 11:36
3  
I might rephrase it as: The table shows whether navigation is included in related cars or not. -- Pushing not to the end would emphasize the word "not". (Also consider a navigator or a navigation system as alternatives to navigation.) –  Damkerng T. Feb 28 at 12:44
    
One could also say "whether or not navigation is included in related cars", which as Damkerng says would de-emphasize the word not in relation to navigation and related cars. I would put the "not" either there or at the end. In any case, "whether" is better than "that" here. –  BobRodes Feb 28 at 15:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The table shows whether navigation is included or not in related cars.

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1  
'that' doesn't go with 'or' as Stoney B pointed out to one of of my answers. –  Lucian Sava Feb 28 at 11:15
1  
In conversational English you'll also frequently hear it phrase as "The table shows whether or not navigation is included in related cars". –  KChaloux Feb 28 at 16:32

You are asking for one sentence and there could be many options to convey the message.

For instance, I may prefer telling...

The table shows whether the car has (built-in) navigation (system).

Please note that whether will take care of the option of not having navigation. We often say...

I went out to check whether it was raining.

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Personally, I'd almost always say "I went out to check if it was raining." –  snailplane Feb 28 at 12:09
    
I heard the sound and went out to check whether it's raining. What's the problem in this? No condition here just options it rains or doesn't. –  Maulik V Feb 28 at 13:12
    
Oh, it's just in that particular example, whether sounded too heavy / formal for me to use. Concerns like formality aside, whether and if are interchangeable in that grammatical situation (as markers of subordinate interrogative clauses), and you can use whichever you prefer. But there is one problem, since you ask: it's is a contraction of it is or it has, but not it was. So in your latest example, I'd say instead "I heard the sound and went out to check whether it was raining." –  snailplane Feb 28 at 13:17

A common way to express this concept is

The table shows that navigation may or may not be included in related cars.

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