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The professor hoped to interest his students in English grammar.

His explanations were so interesting that all the students interested in.

Are the words which I have put in italics correctly used in these sentences?

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His explanations were so interesting that all the students were/got/became interested in (them). –  Damkerng T. Mar 17 at 13:18

2 Answers 2

As you seem to have figured out, interest can be used as a verb (to arouse the curiosity of) or as a noun (a feeling of wanting to know more about something).1

A professor can use either form to express his hope:

As a professor I hope to interest my students in English grammar. (verb)
As a professor I hope to increase my students' interest in English grammar. (noun)
As a professor I hope my students experience an increased interest in English grammar. (noun)

All of those are grammatical, but I'm not sure any of them represent how I'd express that sentiment. I think these two options sound more natural to my ear:

As a professor I hope my students become more interested in English grammar.
As a professor I hope my students find English grammar more and more interesting.

That said, the verb usage is acceptable, and the word does get used that way:

As a professor of English I feel it my duty to interest my students in the literature of all periods. (from Journal of Canadian Fiction, 1973)

This sentence of yours does need some work, though:

His explanations were so interesting that all the students interested in.

Specifically, we need a verb before interested in, and an object after it. For example:

His explanations were so interesting that all the students became interested in the subject.
His explanations were so interesting that all the students remained interested in his lectures.
His explanations were so interesting that all the students found themselves interested in the topic.

We could also change the preposition:

His explanations were so interesting that all the students stayed interested until the bell rang.


1Definitions 1 & 10 at Collins are paraphrased in parentheses.

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I assume your concern comes from the financial meaning of the word "interest".
The word “interest” has also a meaning of: attention, concern, curiosity, importance, etc.
As a result, the usage of “interest” is correct in your examples.
Regarding the third example, to be correct it should have a verb before: “were/got/became” like in Damkerng T comment.

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The third usage is actually incorrect, as far as I can see. ("...all the students interested in.") Would you mind addressing that point? That would be a verb form of the word I literally haven't seen before. (I know, I don't get out much.) –  Jonathan Garber Mar 17 at 13:49
    
I thought the verb "were" was omitted. If not so, you are right the usage is not correct. –  Lucian Sava Mar 17 at 13:53
    
Ahh. That would make sense. Perhaps the OP can clarify. "...that all the students [were] interested in [the subject]" would be much more reasonable. –  Jonathan Garber Mar 17 at 13:56
    
What makes you think that the financial meaning of interest has anything to do with this question? Nothing in the question would lead me to make that assumption (in fact, I'd assume the opposite). –  J.R. Mar 17 at 14:18
    
Actually I can’t produce any plausible evidence to sustain my assumption. This was once my concern and I thought it was his, too. Obviously it has nothing to do with the subject. It was proved I was wrong. –  Lucian Sava Mar 18 at 6:15

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