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I've already read this sentence and I don't know the exactly sense.

Married people don't always hit it off.

I think maybe it means married people aren't always happy. Am I wrong?

Thanks a lot for the help.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is easily discovered with a dictionary, provided you know to look up the whole phrase: hit it off.

The phrase means to have a good relationship with; to get along well together.

Although it's roughly the same as being happy, I'd say it's more a matter of being compatible.

The whole sentence means that, after young lovers get married, they often find that they find themselves bickering with each other more than they enjoy each others' company. I'd paraphrase it as:

Married people don't always have a harmonious relationship.

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Thank you. I couldn't find the expression in my dictionary. –  MaríaCC Mar 23 at 16:48
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But I think it's not an appropriate use (with married people). To me, hit it off is something that happens when two people first meet and describes their first encounter. Married people are definitely beyond that point in their relationships. –  Jim Mar 23 at 19:25
    
@María - I understand that phrasal verbs can be hard to find in the dictionary, and therefore can be hard to interpret. Verbs used in conjunction with out, up, on, or off often have different meanings, and are can be listed separately. This can make these words hard to look up. –  J.R. Mar 23 at 19:25
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@Jim - That's a good point, and I agree with it. That said, I can imagine contexts where the phrase could be used in the context of marriage. (For example: Many people meet their future spouse using an online dating service. After a relatively brief courtship, they get married, only to find that they are not hitting it off.) But you're right in pointing out that the phrase is more likely to be used when talking about the early stages of a relationship (e.g., I took Jill out on two or three dates, but we never really hit it off). –  J.R. Mar 23 at 19:30
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@Jim Also, arranged marriages... sometimes the wedding is the first time they get to meet each other. –  toandfro Mar 23 at 23:52

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