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I wrote this sentence:

I choosed XXX University not just because it is a well-known university in the scientific community and its highly valued education, but...

I don't know if and is grammatically correct.

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How about: "I chose XXX University not only because of its invaluable education and its reputation in the scientific community, but ..." –  Damkerng T. Mar 28 at 13:51
    
@DamkerngT. write an answer to accept it please –  Marco Dinatsoli Mar 28 at 13:59
    
@DamkerngT.I think it sounds good with "...because it is a well-known university...", instead of that "because of" form that you suggested. And also you replaces "just" with "only" - both are possible, a matter of writer's call at the end. Overall I think the original sentence is fine as it is. –  Man_From_India Mar 28 at 14:30
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@Man_From_India Though it's a matter of choice, there is one problem with the OP's sentence, which is the part: because [it is a well-known university in the scientific community] and [its highly valued education]. Ah, StoneyB just posted what I'm about to say. –  Damkerng T. Mar 28 at 14:55
    
@DamkerngT. Thanks I got it –  Man_From_India Mar 28 at 15:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think you're trying to say something like "not only because of A and B, but also Z".

Here is my suggestion (I changed your wording a little, but tried my best to convey the same meaning):

I chose XXX University not only because of its invaluable education and its reputation in the scientific community, but also ...

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I think you're right about what the OP is trying to say. So, I'm going to say that your answer is better than mine. :) @Marco: you might think of my answer as giving some additional information that might be useful. –  BobRodes Mar 28 at 14:44
    
@Marco The first time I posted it, I couldn't come up with a nice adjective in place of "highly valued" (there is nothing wrong with "highly valued education", actually, it's quite common). Now I can think of a few alternatives: "highly regarded education", "highly respected education", and "respectable education". –  Damkerng T. Mar 28 at 15:11

And joins constituents which play the same syntactic role.

The sentence you have written may be reduced to

I chose XXX University not just because [A and B], but also ...

In that construction, both A and B must be able to serve as complements of because. Because takes a clause as its complement:

okbecause [it is a well known university in the scientific community]

But because cannot take an NP as a complement; with an NP you must use because of.

∗ because [its highly valued education]
okbecause of [its highly valued education]

Consequently, you need to rewrite your sentence so your A and B are syntactically parallel:

... because [[it is a well known university in the scientific community] and [its education is highly valued]]
... because of [ [its reputation in the scientific community] and [its highly valued education]

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The sentence isn't correct. You should use "but" here because of the negation (the "not"). "Not X but Y" or "not just ("only" is also common here) X but also Y" are common constructions in English. (We use "and" in an "X and Y" construction.) Also, choose is a "strong" verb; the correct past tense is "chose", not "choosed". So:

I chose XXX University not just because it is a well-known university in the scientific community, but also because of its highly-valued education.

I wouldn't add anything to this sentence, so I left your "but..." off of the end. Now, here's how you could use "and":

I chose XXX University because it is a well-known university in the scientific community, and [also] because of its highly-valued education.

As you can see, taking the "not" out of the sentence allows you to use an "X and Y" construction. This is of course also common.

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I think OP intends the reputation and the education to be conjoined under the not only, and has omitted as irrelevant the matter which is to follow but. –  StoneyB Mar 28 at 14:36
    
I think so too. I meant to explain that whatever irrelevant matter he has omitted should be put into a new sentence. –  BobRodes Mar 28 at 14:38
    
I mean that I think OP intends "I chose X not only because of A and B but also [because of C]." –  StoneyB Mar 28 at 14:39

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