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As far as I am concerned.
As far as the economic problems here are concerned.
And As far as I know.

My perception: All these are incorrect. Because we just use " As far as I am concerned" to mean " In my opinion" . Therefore it does not actually make sense saying: " in the economic problems's opinion." " I can say my opinion" " I know my opinion" and so forth.

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Note that we don't generally say "as far as I can say" but "as far as I can tell". Here "tell" has the sense "perceive". –  StoneyB Apr 4 at 18:40
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you are mistakenly generalizing on a single instance.

As far as I am concerned may be used in contexts where it has approximately the same effect as saying in my opinion; but it does not mean in my opinion.

Examine the actual construction of the expression as far as X is concerned:

as far as means to the extent or degree that
X is concerned means X is involved or relevant

Consequently, as far as I am concerned only has the effect of saying in my opinion when it is used to introduce an opinion.

As far as I am concerned, Bob’s a jerk.This means “My concern in this matter does not go beyond recognizing that Bob’s a jerk; I am not interested in any subtler analysis of his behavior.”

But in other contexts as far as X is concerned takes on quite different meanings:

As far as the economic problems here are concerned ...This means “To the extent that our discourse involves the economic problems here [I have this to say] ...”

Similarly, as far as I know means to the extent that my knowledge reaches—that is, “I do not claim to know everything about this topic, but what I do know is this ...”

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Depending on the context there are different words to replace the phrase “as far as”.

In your first example you can replace it with “regarding” or “concerning” or with another phrase “with regard to” or “with reference to”.

In your second example you can replace it with: “to my knowledge” or “to the best of my knowledge”.

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As far as shows up to the extent here in all. They all are possible. It's not necessary that you can always replace with my opinion and if you do, the context may change. Let me try one of the examples here...

"He has an affair with her. Do you know that?"
"As far as I know, he hasn't" - this binds your limitations of knowledge or information.

Now read this -

"He has an affair with her. Do you know that?"
"In my opinion, he hasn't - that's much of your opinion not necessarily dependent on news or information you get from your friends.

When we say as far as, we generally bind ourselves with some limitations.

Further examples will make it clear -

My remembrance says that you never kept the keys in the drawer - you are quite sure about it
As far as my remembrance goes, you never kept the keys in the drawer - means almost same but here, you are limiting your remembrance a bit.

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+1 for binding the limitations of knowledge and information. –  Lucian Sava Apr 4 at 17:29
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