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Here is the background facts:

  • I now live in Asia.
  • In the future, I am going to live abroad, in Europe.
  • It is (right now) my decision to adopt some kittens in Europe.

I'm not sure about constructing the present/future tenses to relate these two events like this.

  • "Once arriving abroad, in the new country, we decide to keep some kitten."
  • "Once arriving abroad, in the new country, we have decided to keep some kitten."
  • "Once arriving abroad, in the new country, we are going to keep some kitten."

Also, I'm not sure about the plural of "young cats":

  • Kitten?
  • Some kitten?

Many thanks.

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We're going to need to fix your question or it will get closed. I'm going to submit an edit based on what I understand. Please let me know if my edit is correct. (Give me a minute.) –  CoolHandLouis Apr 12 at 10:19
    
@CoolHandLouis - Yes your edit is correct. Thank you so much. Changing the setting as you suggested, now I think I could get more answers. Thank you very much. –  user5036 Apr 12 at 12:53

1 Answer 1

Once I arrive abroad, I'm going to immediately find the nearest pet shop to find some kittens to add to our family.

You are in Asia. You are going to Europe. And you have decided to adopt some kittens after you get there.

Any of these combinations would be fine, but I'm going to point out some subtleties:

  • We've decided to adopt some kittens after we're in Europe.
  • We're going to adopt some kittens after we're in Europe
  • Once we arrive in Europe, we're going to adopt some kittens.
  • Once I arrive abroad, I'm going to immediately find the nearest pet shop to find some kittens to add to our family.

Note the difference between saying "I've decided to" and "I'm going to". The former focuses on what is happening in your head now, as a decision, while the latter focuses on what is going to happen.

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Thank you so much, but this is my decision to buy and keep or adapt some kittens, it seems I should not use "once" in this case, we now live in Asia and we are going to abroad in Europe. Many thanks. –  user5036 Apr 12 at 9:53
    
I added some extra text just before you commented. –  CoolHandLouis Apr 12 at 9:55
1  
In future questions, please consider waiting for multiple answers before choosing a correct one. That benefits both you and future non-native English users. You will get more answers describing various aspects of the language, as more people get to respond to your question. And multiple answers can provide more depth than a single answer. The philosophy of this site is not only to help question askers like yourself, but also to remain as a good question/answer as a resource for future people interested in English. So participation here is not just me & you - it's for the good of everyone. –  CoolHandLouis Apr 12 at 10:45

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