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A startup investor says the following:

What do you understand about your business that other companies in it just don't get?

I don't understand. What do they mean? What does it mean? What is don't get in the sentence?

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what's the source? What's the context? Where was it spoken? –  Maulik V May 13 at 5:02
    
ycombinator.com –  Tim May 13 at 5:40
    
Be specific. Don't give Homepage URL. I cannot find the phrase anywhere on the page. –  Maulik V May 13 at 5:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. "It" refers to "your business."

    We can rephrase the sentence to:

    What do you understand about your business that other companies in [your business] just don't get?

  2. The word "get" in "just don't get" means:

    Meaning of "get" from Wiktionary

    15. To understand (often used as get it).

    We can rephrase the sentence to:

    What do you understand about your business that other companies in [your business] just don't [understand]?

    For example, for a company that makes hats:

    What do you understand about [making hats] that other companies in [hat making] just don't understand?

Still don't get it? Try reading some sample answers to this question.

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it refers to the similar business and not your business. What do you understand about your business that other companies in [the same business] just don't get? –  Maulik V May 13 at 5:17
4  
@MaulikV It's arguable since "business" can (roughly) be A) A specific establishment or B) A field or trade. In this context, I think it's B. –  helix May 13 at 5:24
    
ok, thank you, cos I thought "your business" means "your company", so that is wrong right. does "your business" mean "your business industry" or "your business area"? –  Tim May 13 at 5:24
    
@Tim Added an example. –  helix May 13 at 5:29
    
+1. Everything in this answer seems correct, so I don't know why it was downvoted. –  snailplane May 13 at 9:34

Helix's answer is totally fine, but I'm going to use some examples to make it clearer.

Let's say you're going to start a car manufacturing business and you need an investor. Now, an investor would want to be sure that he'd get good returns on his investment. So he asks you this question:

There are other companies in this business. Why should I invest in your company? What do you understand about your business [car manufacturing] that other companies in it [car manufacturing] just don't get [don't understand]?

Because if you know more about this business than other companies, then obviously you are going to make profit and I would get good returns on my investment.

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