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My baby moves violently in womb. My baby moves vigorously in womb.

Do "Violently" and "Vigorously" have the same meaning? Which one means move strongly?

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Both of them are too intense to describe a baby's movement. You can use phrase -billy-o. My baby moves like billy-o inside my womb. Sounds kinda cute as well :) –  Sandeep Dhamija May 15 at 6:22
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I don't think either is too intense- in fact they're quite vivid and descriptive. "Violently" has a negative connotation, you could use that if the baby's movement was bothersome. As an American English speaker, I've never heard the term "billy-o". It sounds British. –  evan May 15 at 6:44

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How to describe baby movement?

Both violently and vigorously mean move strongly. Violently is more descriptive. As @evan said "Violently" has a negative connotation, you could use that if the baby's movement was bothersome.

Personally I would think violently is the best of the two. Often expectant mothers will use words such as frequently or constantly to describe baby movement. Vigorously seems too medical for a normal description.

Finishing the Sentence

It should also be noted that "moves in womb" is not complete. You need to add a "the", "my", "his", or "her" between "in" and "womb"

My baby moves violently in my womb.

Description of the baby moving inside yourself.

My baby moves violently in her womb.

Depending on context, you could be talking about a pregnant woman or speaking from the perspective of a female baby.

My baby moves violently in his womb.

Speaking from the perspective of a male baby.

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An interesting, but possibly confusing, take on womb ownership :) "My baby moves violently in her womb" can also be seen from the perspective of the father, talking about his baby inside the mother's womb. Which is how I read it first, making the version with "his" womb quite... strange :) But that is indeed just my (mis)reading :) –  oerkelens May 15 at 7:37
    
Heh. "...in his womb." –  Alexander May 15 at 19:24

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