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I clicked a few promising entries from the countless services that offer redemption in the form of cash for abused electronics and settled on a $70 offer from an outfit called iCracked, whose name suggested it could sympathize with my mental state.

In this paragraph all things happened in the past, why offer is still in present tense?

Source:LARB

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Probably at the time the author wrote that, those services still offered the mentioned redemption. –  Damkerng T. May 18 at 14:26
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I clicked a few promising entries from the countless services that offer redemption …

The services continue to exist, and continue to offer cash for used electronics today.


I clicked a few promising entries from the countless services that offered redemption …

I clicked a few promising entries from the countless services that were offering redemption …

The services existed at the time, but it is unknown whether they are still in business today.


If this excerpt is from a how-to article, the present-tense version is more effective, since it is dispensing advice for how you can sell used electronics, rather than just telling an interesting story.

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And if it is known that the services no longer offer redemption then it would be natural to say, "the countless services that at that time offered redemption". –  Steve Jessop May 18 at 18:38
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In the above phrase, they used offer instead of offered because the services that the author talks of still allow redemption in form of cash.

To further clarify this, if they phrased it like -

Countless services that offered redemption in form of cash...

Then it would mean that those services used to offer redemption in form of cash and they no longer support such redemption which we assume is false.

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No it wouldn't. The past tense would be a valid choice whether they currently offer such redemptions or not. The present tense is a valid choice if they still offer them, or if the author may reasonably assume that they probably do. The example is in the overlap, and so they could have used the present tense (as they did) or the past, and been technically correct either way. –  Jon Hanna May 18 at 21:22
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