Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language Learners Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for speakers of other languages learning English. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is a dialog from a post on an English learning blog.

M: Do we need to get together to plan our seminar?
W: Is there anything wrong with right now?

Is there anything wrong with the dialog?

Below is what I thought. It's marked as hidden in case you want to answer the question without any influence.

I think the dialog makes it sound like "get together" implies getting together in the future, but in my opinion, it's not so. (To hint that, M.'d better say, "Do we need to get back together ...?") So, it's strange to ask if there is anything wrong with "right now". Also, I think something like "Let's do it now." is more natural if W. wanted to make plan together with M. right away.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

"right now"

Nope. It's using right now as a time, similar to:

  • Is there anything wrong with tomorrow?
  • Is there anything wrong with Wednesday?
  • Is there anything wrong with May 1st?
  • Is there anything wrong with Easter break?
  • Is there anything wrong with Sunday week?

"is there anything wrong with"

This works because:

  1. M has asked whether they need to get together to plan their seminar, implying a time in the future.
  2. W has asked if there is anything wrong with right now, implying that M has asked to make plans in the future because doing it now might not be suitable.
    • Also, asking if there's anything wrong with right now, depending on the tone, can be a challenge, as in "why don't you want to do it now", or as an act of politeness, as in "if there's a reason you can't do it now, I'm giving you the chance to tell me".
      Of course, both impinge on the other person by demanding a reason, but the intonation would determine how it's perceived.
share|improve this answer
3  
I agree with the above answer. I would add one comment. Unless you want your request to come across as demanding or too aggressive, don't use negative words (wrong, don't, can't). Better something like "Is it OK with you if we meet right now?" –  user3169 May 20 at 1:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.