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Lately, I watched Kill Bill (Vol. 1), with quite an attention. At the last (when Beatrix speaks to Sophie), I got confused by a few dialogues. She said,

"I want him to know what I know. I want him to know I want him to know"

The first sentence isn't a problem. But, the second sentence looks as if she's repeating "I want him to know". What does the phrase really mean? Is it simply repetition, or is she meaning something else? And, is it the right way to phrase it?

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"I want him to know what I know." = [What I know] is what I want him to know. "I want him to know I want him to know" = [I want him to know (whatever I want him to know)] is what I want him to know. So, in short, besides that I want that him to know what that I know, that I also want that him to know that that I want that him to know that purposely, intentionally, and explicitly. –  Damkerng T. Aug 11 at 6:41
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@DamkerngT.: Wow! That's really convincing. Um, It'd be nice if you post that as an answer :) –  Waffle's Crazy Peanut Aug 11 at 6:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I don't remember that line (and probably most parts of the movie :-), but it still sounds cool anyway.

"I want him to know what I know. I want him to know I want him to know."

Basically, she is saying that she wants him to know [what she knows], and she doesn't want just that, she wants him to know that [she wants him to know], too.
(I use brackets as reading aid, to make it easier to group words together when reading.)

Let's recap:

"I want him to know what I know." = [What I know] is what I want him to know.
"I want him to know I want him to know" = [That I want him to know (whatever I want him to know)] is what I want him to know. The original might be easier to read if we add a that to make the clause more obvious, like this: "I want him to know [(that) I want him to know]." Grammatically, this that can be (and often is) omitted.

So, in short, besides she wants him to know what she knows, she also wants him to know that she wants him to know that, purposely, intentionally, and explicitly.

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Alright, I'm totally convinced now. Thanks Damkerng ;-) –  Waffle's Crazy Peanut Aug 11 at 7:02
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You're welcome, and thanks for accepting my answer. However, it's recommended to wait for a while (maybe at least several hours) to encourage other users to post their answers (which might be even better than the first one), even when you believe that the first one is correct. (For example, those who can still remember the movie might be able to provide more depth to that line in the context of the movie, while I simply read it straightforwardly.) –  Damkerng T. Aug 11 at 7:07
    
Oh, yeah! I understand. Okay, I'll rewind the clock back to the second before I accepted your answer :P –  Waffle's Crazy Peanut Aug 11 at 7:27
    
Dear Damkerng, I think you left another question. Is that way of "repetitive" (confusing) framing right? (I mean, grammatically?) o_O –  Waffle's Crazy Peanut Aug 11 at 7:31
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That sentence is grammatical. However, not every clause will be grammatical when being repeated twice, consecutively. (For example, *"He loves her he loves her". -- * denotes ungrammatical usage.) That sentence from the movie is grammatical because the latter part is a subordinate clause (with that being omitted). -- We say something like this all the time. My favorite one is perhaps, "I don't know what you did or didn't do, but I do know that I can't know what you do or you don't know. You know?" (from Veep). –  Damkerng T. Aug 11 at 7:48

The second sentence has an implicit that in it:

I want him to know [that] I want him to know.

This sort of that is optional in English. You can leave them out so long as doing so isn't confusing.

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True, but I think this is a case where the removal makes the statement less clear. In writing, I wouldn't do it. In speech, you can get away with it by using proper emphasis (i.e. "I want him to know I want him to know.") And that's why it works in the film. –  trlkly Aug 11 at 9:38
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@trlkly, I think it would have benefited from an explicit that here. This is the scene (go to about 2:15): youtube.com/watch?v=9IY_aqr_tQo –  Dangph Aug 11 at 11:24
    
Yep... That intentionally leaving "that" is exactly the cause for my confusion. Thanks for your answer :) –  Waffle's Crazy Peanut Aug 12 at 2:09

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