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Many times I have come across the word your. People use it instead of you are I guess so. Is it a mistake or has it another special meaning? Now I do not have the exact context but surely I will add it once I get.

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2 Answers 2

When you see your used where you are is called for, what you are probably seeing is a mis-spelling of the contraction you’re.

This is a very common mistake, among native speakers as well as learners, because in many spoken dialects there is little or no difference between the pronunciations of your and you’re. In ‘textspeak’, the non-standard spelling employed coloquially in texting and on the internet, they are spelled identically: ur.

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Very basic question and words are often found incorrectly used by non-natives (In India, I've come across many such examples).

If you read 'your' in place of 'you are' it is either plain wrong or you have misread it! [For example, on the internet, you also find loose weight that does not mean it's correct].

What you have read is You're which is a contraction of You are.

'Your' means something belonging to you and "you are" denotes you, yourself.

That is your you are car
You are your a girl.

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Native speakers have problems with your and you're too. –  snailboat Aug 19 at 3:41
    
I have a hunch that native speakers make this error more often than non-native speakers. My idea is that it's rare to find a learner who learned English through reading and makes this kind of error. However, due to the popularity of autocorrect programs, I think this error could happen to anyone nowadays. –  Damkerng T. Aug 19 at 5:04

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