English Language Learners Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for speakers of other languages learning English. Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top
  1. At the time it was felt that engines and passengers could not survive the journey without a rest stop.

  2. At the time it was felt that engines and passengers could not survive the journey without stopping a rest.

  3. At the time it was felt that engines and passengers could not survive the journey without they stop for a rest.

1 is a random sentence I found on Internet, presumably on an British site; 2 and 3 are varied forms of 1.

Supposing 1 is good English, are 2 and 3 okay, too? If so, are there differences in meaning?

share|improve this question
3  
#2 has to be without stopping for a rest, and (I think) #3 is non-standard "dialectal" (I often use it myself, but I suspect not everyone approves! :) – FumbleFingers Mar 14 '13 at 23:33
1  
@FumbleFingers- I've heard #3 too, usually in Gangster movies set in NYC, and it's pronounced, "widdout dey stop for a rest." – Jim Mar 15 '13 at 1:07
    
@Jim: I'm sure most of several thousand instances of "without I have to" are for this usage (I doubt many of them are the reported speech of Noo York Eye-talian gangsters! :) – FumbleFingers Mar 15 '13 at 3:34

The first sentence is correct, though it refers to a "rest stop" (a place for resting) rather than just a rest. It could include additional activity such as eating or taking a nap.

The second sentence could be

At the time it was felt that engines and passengers could not survive the journey without stopping for a rest.

As for the third sentence, it could be

At the time it was felt that engines and passengers could not survive the journey unless they stopped for a rest.

But I don't see much real difference in meaning between them.

share|improve this answer
    
#1 needn't refer to a place - it can refer to an action, with a stop = a break = a breather = a recess. – FumbleFingers Mar 15 '13 at 3:30
    
"Rest stop" in this sense very often doesn't mean a real "rest" (to recover from being tired), but for the use of a "rest room", another euphemism for "comfort station". – barbara beeton Mar 15 '13 at 17:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.