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While reading this blog, I could not find the meaning of 'summary execution'.

When I tried to find the meaning of this phrase, I got the phrases like 'summary judgement', and 'summary proceeding'.

My questions are: What is a meaning of 'summary execution'? Is it a legal jargon or an idiomatic phrase as it is written with an inverted comma?

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I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because a search for summary execution define shows this is an easily answerable "basic question on meaning." – GoDucks Feb 9 at 16:56
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@GoDucks: Very few dictionaries list it, and both are online-only; our policy on dictionary reference questions is intended to allow someone who normally looks up words in one or two good, recently published, hard-copy dictionaries they possess to ask questions about anything not found in those. – Nathan Tuggy Feb 9 at 17:20
    
Military speak for "murder" – CodesInChaos Feb 9 at 18:31
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Just a suggestion for the future - search first just for the word you don't understand, not the entire phrase. If you looked up summary you would see when it is used as an adjective it has a definition like "(of legal proceedings, jurisdiction, etc.) conducted without, or exempt from, the various steps and delays of a formal trial". – ColleenV Feb 9 at 19:28
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Also summary #2 – user3169 Feb 9 at 21:13

The word summary in your example is not a noun, but an adjective which means:

Law (Of a judicial process) conducted without the customary legal formalities.

Summary execution means:

an execution in which a person is accused of a crime and immediately killed without benefit of a full and fair trial.

You could find more about summary execution in the Wikipedia article.

[Oxford Online Dictionary]

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