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I found the below Facebook post shared on lamebook.com. The caption claims that some word is used with an incorrect meaning, and the title "Ummm, what?" also suggests the same. However, I couldn't find any word wrongly used after reading it several times. Could someone explain what I am missing here?

The sentence is:

New addition to the family, Rosie, her hobbies include Netflix and chill and she enjoys Sunday walks and knitting.

Picture from http://www.lamebook.com/ummm-what/

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up vote 20 down vote accepted

It's not actually a case of a word being misused but a meme: in this case, "Netflix and chill".

It was originally coined as a description of sitting down after a long day and watching some Netflix, but has changed in meaning so it's now a euphemism for inviting someone over with the intention of casual sex.

What the poster is indicating is that saying a dog enjoys "Netflix and chill" is possibly not what the original poster intended.

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2  
Oh, I wasn't aware of this meme. Thanks. – Masked Man Mar 13 at 13:04
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+1 this is the correct answer, but just one nitpick: the meme is the picture with the "you don't know it means" and the netflix and chill is the phrase which functions as an innuendo. The meme should say "You keep using that phrase...". The meme is using incorrect language. :) – Technik Empire Mar 13 at 13:05
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@TechnikEmpire "Netflix and Chill" is still a meme; memes don't have to be images. :) Thanks for the +1 though! – John Clifford Mar 13 at 13:06
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@JohnClifford Nope, your answer do what you think is right. Was trying to clarify terms but the terms we're forced to use here are so loosely defined and broad that meme would actually fit I suppose. Drop the word "nitpick" from my original comment. :) – Technik Empire Mar 13 at 13:11
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@KonradViltersten I would consider any text which goes into heavy/popular use on the internet (or in society in general really) a meme by definition; I think if the piece of text were meant to be an image it wouldn't have been mentioned in the first place because image covers that too. Bear in mind that the concept of a meme was around before the internet was. That said, it's definitely an interesting discussion point and I respect that a lot of people won't share my opinion, so thanks for your comment. – John Clifford Mar 13 at 17:43

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