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Top new questions this week:

What do you call a desperate attempt unlikely to succeed?

What do you call a desperate attempt unlikely to succeed? For example, when other ideas have failed and you have one final go before giving up

word-request phrase-request  
asked by Sergey Zolotarev Score of 9
answered by SoronelHaetir Score of 19

"On the open down"?

I fail to comprehend the part in bold. The Invisible Man, Wells: He vanished behind a laburnum, and appeared again clambering a fence that abutted on the open down.

meaning phrase-meaning  
asked by Sergey Zolotarev Score of 9
answered by DialFrost Score of 19

"Those" seventy dollars or "that" seventy dollars?

"Those" seventy dollars or "that" seventy dollars? E.g. Jack needed those/that seventy dollars. To me "those" sounds more likely because seventy is clearly plural, but ...

grammar word-usage word-choice singular-vs-plural  
asked by Fra Score of 3
answered by Jeff Morrow Score of 9

Using neither alone in a sentence

I'm have trouble with the use of "neither" in some sentences. Example: “You must not drink sodas, neither eat fast food.” “You must not drink sodas neither eat fast food.” (I don't know if ...

grammar neither-nor  
asked by Mary Score of 3
answered by stangdon Score of 6

What does the phrase 'a high diversion shot' mean?

Context: Cops are trying to get a view on an offender, there is a sniper out there trying to see the offender that is inside the high rise building. A: Hailey (the sniper), I need you to get set for ...

meaning phrase-meaning  
asked by Ghost Score of 2
answered by DialFrost Score of 6

the use of import (important) not "of import"

I have had a lot of trouble finding an answer on this, mainly because searching for import obviously has far more results for the other meaning. The few results I have found always give examples of ...

grammaticality-in-context  
asked by RainMan Score of 2

Similar idiomatic phrase to "go to example"?

Consider this hypothetical expression, I use Mr Smith as my go to example, when it comes to how to parent your kids. "go to" sounds too corporate lingo to my ears. Can somebody recommend ...

phrase-usage phrase-request  
asked by Rohit Score of 2
answered by James K Score of 2

Greatest hits from previous weeks:

Will you find someone saying "at your convenience" annoying and impolite?

I was writing an invitation email to a female principal who has a higher social status. She is a busy woman, so I would like to ask her to arrange a time and place for a meeting instead. Given that ...

politeness  
asked by kitty Score of 11
answered by Jay Score of 19

When should I use "when" and "while"?

But you can't find anything while you're crying. But you can't find anything when you're crying. I'll tell you about it while Frank saddles the horse. I'll tell you about it when Frank saddles ...

prepositions  
asked by Amish Aa Score of 11
answered by apaderno Score of -2

"Did you watch this movie?" or "Have you watched this movie?"

What is the difference between Did you watch this movie? and Have you watched this movie?

questions present-perfect past-simple  
asked by Geek Score of 16
answered by WendiKidd Score of 27

Difference between "fast food" and "junk food"

What is the difference between "fast food" and "junk food"? Are they the same or not? "Are they used in the same way?"

difference usage food  
asked by Ice Girl Score of 23
answered by user 726941 Score of 21

"How much is its cost" vs "How much does it cost"

When buying something, what it more suitable to ask the seller? How much does it cost? How much is its cost? I know that the word "cost" is a verb and noun as well, but my question is ...

auxiliary-verbs possessives  
asked by Virtuous Legend Score of 3
answered by Gary Botnovcan Score of 6

Difference between ' and "

What's the difference between a single and a double quotation mark in English? I've heard that it only depends on where you live the US (for double quotation mark) or the UK and Australia (for single ...

punctuation writing style  
asked by SovereignSun Score of 1
answered by Michael Lorton Score of 3

"Have been doing" and "have done"

What's the difference between I have been playing tennis for five years. and I have played tennis for five years. Are they grammatically correct? If yes, how are they different in meaning/...

difference present-perfect progressive-aspect  
asked by user1677 Score of 13
answered by Damkerng T. Score of 16

Can you answer these questions?

suffix: -acea, -aceae (any difference of pronunciation and the right pronunciation?)

-acea, -aceae What is the right pronunciation? What is the difference?

suffixes  
asked by BEBYGONES Score of 1

“being raised” followed by a verb

While reading David Crystal's Sounds Appealing, I came across the following sentence. There was a Pronunciation Unit that dealt with queries (such as how to pronounce the name of a foreign place or ...

passive-voice gerunds past-participles  
asked by Bhaskar from India Score of 2
answered by Atrius Score of 0

Which is correct? "Today I've done something that I've never done before." or "Today I've done something I never did before

Question: Which is correct? "Today I've done something that I've never done before." or "Today I've done something I never did before. Personally, the second one seems the most logical ...

present-perfect past-simple  
asked by englishfreak9 Score of 1
answered by James K Score of 0
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