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Top new questions this week:

Seven Pounds Eight and Eight Pence

In Cedric Mount's one-act play 'The Never Never Nest', Aunt Jane asks Jack: How can you pay seven pounds eight and eight pence out of six pounds? I thought seven pounds eight and eight pence ...

word-choice  
asked by mahmud koya 12 votes
answered by Michael Harvey 23 votes

What does "notoriety" mean here?

As you know the word "notoriety" often has a negative meaning: notoriety :the state of being famous for something bad. notoriety : fame for being bad in some way. But it seems notoriety has a ...

meaning-in-context  
asked by Peace 7 votes
answered by Jason Bassford Supports Monica 5 votes

What's the difference between words "tongue" and "lingua"?

Dictionary.com definitions: tongue - the usually movable organ in the floor of the mouth in humans and most vertebrates, functioning in eating, in tasting, and, in humans, in speaking. ...

meaning word-usage difference  
asked by Mikhail 5 votes
answered by TypeIA 35 votes

Theme or Topic - what's the difference?

Theme or Topic - what's the difference? Are they synonyms?

synonyms  
asked by dSH 5 votes
answered by Astralbee 7 votes

"An animal and an animal" or "An animal and animal", which is correct?

"I am moving in with a dog and a cat" versus "I am moving in with a dog and cat" Which is correct?

grammar  
asked by Yu-Cheng Chen 4 votes
answered by Colin Fine 9 votes

"packing with a hard knot in the pit of his stomach" meaning

... Harry Knew why she wanted to spin out their time on the riverbank; several times he saw her look up eagerly and he was sure she had deluded herself into thinking that she heard footsteps ...

meaning-in-context  
asked by dan 4 votes
answered by BobRodes 16 votes

What is the difference between "This is" and "Here is"?

I mean, is there a difference in the meaning, or the contexts for these sentences? When using the one or the other one? My question is about every kind of words. Innert things, or beings, or any ...

grammar meaning-in-context phrase-meaning sentence-choice  
asked by Quidam 4 votes
answered by Enguroo 1 vote

Greatest hits from previous weeks:

What is the difference between symbol and sign?

What is the difference between symbol and sign? In the following text which one is correct? dollar symbol or dollar sign

word-choice  
asked by Premraj 7 votes
answered by JMP 1 vote

swag (slang) -- what does this word really mean?

Source: Russia Is On A 'Holy Mission' And The West Doesn't Get It Example: In his State of the Union address, Obama displayed similar swag and bluster against both the Kremlin and congressional ...

meaning slang  
asked by Michael Rybkin 13 votes
answered by Mari-Lou A 7 votes

How can I tell whether "c" should be pronounced like "s" or like "k"?

How can I tell whether "c" should be pronounced "s" or "k"? I always get confused and pronounce it like "s" because it looks like russian "с".

pronunciation letters-of-the-alphabet  
asked by Артем Иванов 17 votes
answered by temporary_user_name 25 votes

Formally say "thank you for taking the time and effort in doing something"

I hope the question is not too silly, but I think it may help others too. I want to thank the professors that are writing reference letters to me. I thought I'd put this at the end of my email ...

sentence-request  
asked by flen 4 votes
answered by Varun Nair 4 votes

Working in / for / at?

Which is the correct way to tell where I'm working? I'm working in XYZ company. I'm working for XYZ company. I'm working at XYZ company. Or is there any difference in the meaning?

prepositions difference  
asked by Nalaka526 23 votes
answered by kiamlaluno 3 votes

How do you say 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 in words?

One of the answers in a reading exercise in my class today was: 100,000,000,000,000,000,000 ... which was the value of the highest denomination note ever issued. It was a ...

determiners reading-aloud numbers numerals quantifiers  
asked by Araucaria 88 votes
answered by Ben Kovitz 118 votes

Salutation of business letter when recipient is unknown

In writing business letters, when we don't know the name of whom we are writing to which words are better to use? Can we use "To whom it may concern"?

writing  
asked by Hanieh 6 votes
answered by BobRodes 4 votes

Can you answer these questions?

How do I make adjectives from names of regions? California → Californian. Easy. Zabaykalsky Krai →?

Is there some universal rule? Do I even need to add any suffixes? Maybe, I can use those proper nouns on their own, as modifiers, can't I? I see three options: 'Zabaikalian voters' (or ...

word-request word-formation  
asked by Sergey Zolotarev 1 vote
answered by Old Brixtonian 0 votes

Is it natural to say “I’d like a...” when ordering from a restaurant?

If ordering from a restaurant over the phone are the phrases written in bold completely natural in the context? Me: "Hi, I'd like to order a cheese burger..." Restaurant guy: "A cheese ...

idiomatic-language  
asked by writerfadbcl 1 vote

Grammaticality of a sample phrase

Is the phrase 'a proposal that is discussed in a meeting and a vote is taken on it' grammatically correct, and if so, could anyone please explain to me how, as I fail to see it. After the ...

sentence-construction grammaticality  
asked by Taziano Fiorentini 1 vote
answered by AIQ -1 votes
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