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Source (Waterland, by Graham Swift.)

I have several questions about this sentence:

"For fifty-four years she will sit on a blue velvet chair before the window in an upper room (not the room once shared by her husband but a room to be known simply as Mistress Sarah’s room), staring now straight before hernow straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse, now to her leftnow to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise."

  1. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to the Ouse" mean "toward"?

  2. Does the clause "staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight along the cluttered main road of Water Street toward the River Ouse"?

  3. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to her left" mean "toward"?

  4. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to where" also mean "toward"?

  5. Does "now to her left over the rooftops to where" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight toward her left place on the top of the rooftops and stared straight toward the place where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849"?

  6. Is the clause "where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849" an object clause in the containing clause "now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise"?

Source (Waterland, by Graham Swift.)

I have several questions about this sentence:

"For fifty-four years she will sit on a blue velvet chair before the window in an upper room (not the room once shared by her husband but a room to be known simply as Mistress Sarah’s room), staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse, now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise."

  1. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to the Ouse" mean "toward"?

  2. Does the clause "staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight along the cluttered main road of Water Street toward the River Ouse"?

  3. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to her left" mean "toward"?

  4. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to where" also mean "toward"?

  5. Does "now to her left over the rooftops to where" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight toward her left place on the top of the rooftops and stared straight toward the place where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849"?

  6. Is the clause "where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849" an object clause in the containing clause "now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise"?

Source (Waterland, by Graham Swift.)

I have several questions about this sentence:

"For fifty-four years she will sit on a blue velvet chair before the window in an upper room (not the room once shared by her husband but a room to be known simply as Mistress Sarah’s room), staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse, now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise."

  1. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to the Ouse" mean "toward"?

  2. Does the clause "staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight along the cluttered main road of Water Street toward the River Ouse"?

  3. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to her left" mean "toward"?

  4. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to where" also mean "toward"?

  5. Does "now to her left over the rooftops to where" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight toward her left place on the top of the rooftops and stared straight toward the place where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849"?

  6. Is the clause "where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849" an object clause in the containing clause "now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise"?

4 added 18 characters in body
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Source (Waterland, by Graham Swift.)

I have several questions about this sentence:

"For fifty-four years she will sit on a blue velvet chair before the window in an upper room (not the room once shared by her husband but a room to be known simply as Mistress Sarah’s room), staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse, now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise."

Does the word "to" in the phrase "to the Ouse" mean "toward"?

Does the clause "staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight along the cluttered main road of Water Street toward the River Ouse"?

Does the word "to" in the phrase "to her left" mean "toward"?

Does the word "to" in the phrase "to where" also mean "toward"?

Does "now to her left over the rooftops to where" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight toward her left place on the top of the rooftops and stared straight toward the place where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849"?

Is the clause "where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849" an object clause in the containing clause "now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise"?

  1. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to the Ouse" mean "toward"?

  2. Does the clause "staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight along the cluttered main road of Water Street toward the River Ouse"?

  3. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to her left" mean "toward"?

  4. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to where" also mean "toward"?

  5. Does "now to her left over the rooftops to where" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight toward her left place on the top of the rooftops and stared straight toward the place where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849"?

  6. Is the clause "where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849" an object clause in the containing clause "now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise"?

Source (Waterland, by Graham Swift.)

I have several questions about this sentence:

"For fifty-four years she will sit on a blue velvet chair before the window in an upper room (not the room once shared by her husband but a room to be known simply as Mistress Sarah’s room), staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse, now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise."

Does the word "to" in the phrase "to the Ouse" mean "toward"?

Does the clause "staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight along the cluttered main road of Water Street toward the River Ouse"?

Does the word "to" in the phrase "to her left" mean "toward"?

Does the word "to" in the phrase "to where" also mean "toward"?

Does "now to her left over the rooftops to where" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight toward her left place on the top of the rooftops and stared straight toward the place where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849"?

Is the clause "where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849" an object clause in the containing clause "now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise"?

Source (Waterland, by Graham Swift.)

I have several questions about this sentence:

"For fifty-four years she will sit on a blue velvet chair before the window in an upper room (not the room once shared by her husband but a room to be known simply as Mistress Sarah’s room), staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse, now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise."

  1. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to the Ouse" mean "toward"?

  2. Does the clause "staring now straight before her down the cluttered thoroughfare of Water Street to the Ouse" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight along the cluttered main road of Water Street toward the River Ouse"?

  3. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to her left" mean "toward"?

  4. Does the word "to" in the phrase "to where" also mean "toward"?

  5. Does "now to her left over the rooftops to where" mean "Sarah Atkinson stared straight toward her left place on the top of the rooftops and stared straight toward the place where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849"?

  6. Is the clause "where the tall chimney of the New Brewery will rise in 1849" an object clause in the containing clause "now to her left over the rooftops to where, in 1849, the tall chimney of the New Brewery, on its site by the Ouse wharves, will rise"?

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I have a questionseveral questions about the sentence "now to her left over the rooftops to where" from the novel "Waterland" by Graham Swift

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