3 added 159 characters in body
source | link

In English, the second and third statements are correct. "I'm going" indicates a future event and the after indicates a sequencing.

If you are talking from the time where the finishing and walking have both not occurred yet:

I'm going for a walk with him after he finished his work

This sentence would be incorrect because the finishing is in the past, but the walking is in the future, so the sequencing of "after" doesn't work.

I went for a walk with him after he finished his work

This works since the times are in sequence

If you are talking from the time where the finishing is completed but the walking has not occurred yet:

You will have to join them with "since" or "because".

I'm going for a walk with him since he finished his work I'm

I'm going for a walk with him since he has finished his work

These work because "since" (or "because") indicate a condition or state reached. Since has another meaning which is similar to "after", but that is not applicable in this case.

For example,

Since he arrived, I've been rather busy

meaning:

From the time he arrived, I've been busy.

The difference between the second and third would be slight. The present perfect would imply a relevance between the completion of the work and the present action (going for a walk). Either is possible, but in my dialect at least, the present perfect would be more common for processes (like eating, working, etc).

In English, the second and third statements are correct. "I'm going" indicates a future event and the after indicates a sequencing.

I'm going for a walk with him after he finished his work

This sentence would be incorrect because the finishing is in the past, but the walking is in the future, so the sequencing of "after" doesn't work.

I went for a walk with him after he finished his work

This works since the times are in sequence

I'm going for a walk with him since he finished his work I'm going for a walk with him since he has finished his work

These work because "since" (or "because") indicate a condition or state reached. Since has another meaning which is similar to "after", but that is not applicable in this case.

For example,

Since he arrived, I've been rather busy

meaning:

From the time he arrived, I've been busy.

The difference between the second and third would be slight. The present perfect would imply a relevance between the completion of the work and the present action (going for a walk). Either is possible, but in my dialect at least, the present perfect would be more common for processes (like eating, working, etc).

In English, the second and third statements are correct. "I'm going" indicates a future event and the after indicates a sequencing.

If you are talking from the time where the finishing and walking have both not occurred yet:

I'm going for a walk with him after he finished his work

This sentence would be incorrect because the finishing is in the past, but the walking is in the future, so the sequencing of "after" doesn't work.

I went for a walk with him after he finished his work

This works since the times are in sequence

If you are talking from the time where the finishing is completed but the walking has not occurred yet:

You will have to join them with "since" or "because".

I'm going for a walk with him since he finished his work

I'm going for a walk with him since he has finished his work

These work because "since" (or "because") indicate a condition or state reached. Since has another meaning which is similar to "after", but that is not applicable in this case.

For example,

Since he arrived, I've been rather busy

meaning:

From the time he arrived, I've been busy.

The difference between the second and third would be slight. The present perfect would imply a relevance between the completion of the work and the present action (going for a walk). Either is possible, but in my dialect at least, the present perfect would be more common for processes (like eating, working, etc).

2 added 214 characters in body
source | link

In English, the second and third statements are correct. "I'm going" indicates a future event and the after indicates a sequencing.

I'm going for a walk with him after he finished his work

This sentence would be incorrect because the finishing is in the past, but the walking is in the future, so the sequencing of "after" doesn't work.

I went for a walk with him after he finished his work

This works since the times are in sequence

I'm going for a walk with him since he finished his work I'm going for a walk with him since he has finished his work

These work because "since" (or "because") indicate a condition or state reached. Since has another meaning which is similar to "after", but that is not applicable in this case.

For example,

Since he arrived, I've been rather busy

meaning:

From the time he arrived, I've been busy.

The difference between the second and third would be slight. The present perfect would imply a relevance between the completion of the work and the present action (going for a walk). Either is possible, but in my dialect at least, the present perfect would be more common for processes (like eating, working, etc).

In English, the second and third statements are correct. "I'm going" indicates a future event and the after indicates a sequencing.

I'm going for a walk with him after he finished his work

This sentence would be incorrect because the finishing is in the past, but the walking is in the future, so the sequencing of "after" doesn't work.

I went for a walk with him after he finished his work

This works since the times are in sequence

I'm going for a walk with him since he finished his work I'm going for a walk with him since he has finished his work

These work because "since" (or "because") indicate a condition or state reached.

The difference between the second and third would be slight. The present perfect would imply a relevance between the completion of the work and the present action (going for a walk). Either is possible, but in my dialect at least, the present perfect would be more common for processes (like eating, working, etc).

In English, the second and third statements are correct. "I'm going" indicates a future event and the after indicates a sequencing.

I'm going for a walk with him after he finished his work

This sentence would be incorrect because the finishing is in the past, but the walking is in the future, so the sequencing of "after" doesn't work.

I went for a walk with him after he finished his work

This works since the times are in sequence

I'm going for a walk with him since he finished his work I'm going for a walk with him since he has finished his work

These work because "since" (or "because") indicate a condition or state reached. Since has another meaning which is similar to "after", but that is not applicable in this case.

For example,

Since he arrived, I've been rather busy

meaning:

From the time he arrived, I've been busy.

The difference between the second and third would be slight. The present perfect would imply a relevance between the completion of the work and the present action (going for a walk). Either is possible, but in my dialect at least, the present perfect would be more common for processes (like eating, working, etc).

1
source | link

In English, the second and third statements are correct. "I'm going" indicates a future event and the after indicates a sequencing.

I'm going for a walk with him after he finished his work

This sentence would be incorrect because the finishing is in the past, but the walking is in the future, so the sequencing of "after" doesn't work.

I went for a walk with him after he finished his work

This works since the times are in sequence

I'm going for a walk with him since he finished his work I'm going for a walk with him since he has finished his work

These work because "since" (or "because") indicate a condition or state reached.

The difference between the second and third would be slight. The present perfect would imply a relevance between the completion of the work and the present action (going for a walk). Either is possible, but in my dialect at least, the present perfect would be more common for processes (like eating, working, etc).