3 added 3 characters in body
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In your scenario, there are two people staring at each other. The theory is that within 6 secondsix seconds

one of them

will look away. In this usage it means "(at least one) will look away" since it is possible that both might look away at the same time, but the speaker does not know which one will look away ahead of time. In a large group, this phrase would also have the same meaning, that at least "one" of the group does something.

To say

each one of them
every one of them

would mean that they all did something e.g. all looked away, but in this case some of them might not have looked away so these two phrases might be incorrect.

In your scenario, there are two people staring at each other. The theory is that within 6 second

one of them

will look away. In this usage it means "(at least one) will look away" since it is possible that both might look away at the same time, but the speaker does not know which one will look away ahead of time. In a large group, this phrase would also have the same meaning, that at least "one" of the group does something.

To say

each one of them
every one of them

would mean that they all did something e.g. all looked away, but in this case some of them might not have looked away so these two phrases might be incorrect.

In your scenario, there are two people staring at each other. The theory is that within six seconds

one of them

will look away. In this usage it means "(at least one) will look away" since it is possible that both might look away at the same time, but the speaker does not know which one will look away ahead of time. In a large group, this phrase would also have the same meaning, that at least "one" of the group does something.

To say

each one of them
every one of them

would mean that they all did something e.g. all looked away, but in this case some of them might not have looked away so these two phrases might be incorrect.

2 clarify example
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In your scenario, there are two people staring at each other. The theory is that within 6 second

one of them

will look away. Which In this usage it means "at least one""(at least one) will look away. Itaway" since it is possible that both might look away at the same time, but the speaker does not know which one will look away ahead of time. In a large group, this phrase would also have the same meaning, that at least "one" of the group does something.

To say

each one of them
every one of them

would mean that they all did something e.g. all looked away, but in this case some of them might not have looked away so these two phrases wouldmight be incorrect.

In your scenario, there are two people staring at each other. The theory is that within 6 second

one of them

will look away. Which means "at least one" will look away. It is possible both might look away at the same time. In a large group, this phrase would also have the same meaning, that at least "one" of the group does something.

To say

each one of them
every one of them

would mean that they all did something e.g. looked away, but some of them might not have looked away so these two phrases would be incorrect.

In your scenario, there are two people staring at each other. The theory is that within 6 second

one of them

will look away. In this usage it means "(at least one) will look away" since it is possible that both might look away at the same time, but the speaker does not know which one will look away ahead of time. In a large group, this phrase would also have the same meaning, that at least "one" of the group does something.

To say

each one of them
every one of them

would mean that they all did something e.g. all looked away, but in this case some of them might not have looked away so these two phrases might be incorrect.

1
source | link

In your scenario, there are two people staring at each other. The theory is that within 6 second

one of them

will look away. Which means "at least one" will look away. It is possible both might look away at the same time. In a large group, this phrase would also have the same meaning, that at least "one" of the group does something.

To say

each one of them
every one of them

would mean that they all did something e.g. looked away, but some of them might not have looked away so these two phrases would be incorrect.