2 replaced http://english.stackexchange.com/ with https://english.stackexchange.com/
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If you are asking whether modern English has different ways to say "you" to show varying levels of respect, the short answer is "no". There is only you.

(In this English is not as flexible as other languages -- for example you might enjoy Japanese where there are perhaps a dozen ways to say "you", each with its own nuance of gender, respectfulness, historical context, and formality)

In English we do have a few honorifics which can be used to denote respect: Mister, Sir, Missus, Miss, etc. as well as various other ways to be more respectful, but none to be less, at least not without adding modifiers like "you jerk", "you bastard", "you asshole" and so on.

Of historical interest, English used to have two forms to address someone in the second person: "you" and "thee/thou""thee/thou", as well as the plural "ye". In modern English, thee and thou (as well as the other forms like thy and thine) are only used in formal religious contexts, literature that reproduces archaic language, and certain fixed phrases such as "fare thee well".

For this reason, many associate the pronoun with formality, however, thee was actually the informal and you was the formalthee was actually the informal and you was the formal.

So since (grammatically) yelling at someone, "Get thy ass over here!" would probably going to send mixed signals, all we're left with is plain old you.

If you are asking whether modern English has different ways to say "you" to show varying levels of respect, the short answer is "no". There is only you.

(In this English is not as flexible as other languages -- for example you might enjoy Japanese where there are perhaps a dozen ways to say "you", each with its own nuance of gender, respectfulness, historical context, and formality)

In English we do have a few honorifics which can be used to denote respect: Mister, Sir, Missus, Miss, etc. as well as various other ways to be more respectful, but none to be less, at least not without adding modifiers like "you jerk", "you bastard", "you asshole" and so on.

Of historical interest, English used to have two forms to address someone in the second person: "you" and "thee/thou", as well as the plural "ye". In modern English, thee and thou (as well as the other forms like thy and thine) are only used in formal religious contexts, literature that reproduces archaic language, and certain fixed phrases such as "fare thee well".

For this reason, many associate the pronoun with formality, however, thee was actually the informal and you was the formal.

So since (grammatically) yelling at someone, "Get thy ass over here!" would probably going to send mixed signals, all we're left with is plain old you.

If you are asking whether modern English has different ways to say "you" to show varying levels of respect, the short answer is "no". There is only you.

(In this English is not as flexible as other languages -- for example you might enjoy Japanese where there are perhaps a dozen ways to say "you", each with its own nuance of gender, respectfulness, historical context, and formality)

In English we do have a few honorifics which can be used to denote respect: Mister, Sir, Missus, Miss, etc. as well as various other ways to be more respectful, but none to be less, at least not without adding modifiers like "you jerk", "you bastard", "you asshole" and so on.

Of historical interest, English used to have two forms to address someone in the second person: "you" and "thee/thou", as well as the plural "ye". In modern English, thee and thou (as well as the other forms like thy and thine) are only used in formal religious contexts, literature that reproduces archaic language, and certain fixed phrases such as "fare thee well".

For this reason, many associate the pronoun with formality, however, thee was actually the informal and you was the formal.

So since (grammatically) yelling at someone, "Get thy ass over here!" would probably going to send mixed signals, all we're left with is plain old you.

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If you are asking whether modern English has different ways to say "you" to show varying levels of respect, the short answer is "no". There is only you.

(In this English is not as flexible as other languages -- for example you might enjoy Japanese where there are perhaps a dozen ways to say "you", each with its own nuance of gender, respectfulness, historical context, and formality)

In English we do have a few honorifics which can be used to denote respect: Mister, Sir, Missus, Miss, etc. as well as various other ways to be more respectful, but none to be less, at least not without adding modifiers like "you jerk", "you bastard", "you asshole" and so on.

Of historical interest, English used to have two forms to address someone in the second person: "you" and "thee/thou", as well as the plural "ye". In modern English, thee and thou (as well as the other forms like thy and thine) are only used in formal religious contexts, literature that reproduces archaic language, and certain fixed phrases such as "fare thee well".

For this reason, many associate the pronoun with formality, however, thee was actually the informal and you was the formal.

So since (grammatically) yelling at someone, "Get thy ass over here!" would probably going to send mixed signals, all we're left with is plain old you.