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Before you read on, I just want to let you know that this question is one that relates to the balance of logic and grammar.

So I know that are multiple ways to describe a first-cousin relationship. I have heard people say 'We share the same grandparents'/'He/she is the child of my aunt/uncle.'or even just 'we are first cousins'.

However, I came across an interesting situation when I tried to rephrase'One of my parents and one of his/her parents are siblings.' (Which I find wordy and repetitive) whilst still maintaining the focus on parents. When I tried rewording it like this :

  • One of our parents are siblings. (Don't even think this is grammatically correct as the verb doesn't agree with the subject).

It turned out to be ambiguous, as though I am talking about only ONE parent instead of ONE PARENT ON BOTH SIDES. If I change that to:

  • One of both of our parents are siblings.

It sounds very awkward and equally unclear. I remember coming across a English grammar article a long time ago describing a similar case, but have long forgot if there is a proper term for this kind of ambiguity. To further elaborate on my question, to say:

  • Both of our parents are siblings.

Would also be open to more than one interpretations. What about:

  • One parents from each side are siblings (or should I say "is siblings")

Overall, in the case that there are two subjects/parties involved (my cousin and I) and more than two objects (4 parents total, 2 each), how can I make myself clear?

Many thanks for your answers.

Before you read on, I just want to let you know that this question is one that relates to the balance of logic and grammar.

So I know that are multiple ways to describe a first-cousin relationship. I have heard people say 'We share the same grandparents'/'He/she is the child of my aunt/uncle.'or even just 'we are first cousins'.

However, I came across an interesting situation when I tried to rephrase'One of my parents and one of his/her parents are siblings.' (Which I find wordy and repetitive) whilst still maintaining the focus on parents. When I tried rewording it like this :

  • One of our parents are siblings. (Don't even think this is grammatically correct as the verb doesn't agree with the subject).

It turned out to be ambiguous, as though I am talking about only ONE parent instead of ONE PARENT ON BOTH SIDES. If I change that to:

  • One of both of our parents are siblings.

It sounds very awkward and equally unclear. I remember coming across a English grammar article a long time ago describing a similar case, but have long forgot if there is a proper term for this kind of ambiguity. To further elaborate on my question, to say:

  • Both of our parents are siblings.

Would also be open to more than one interpretations.

Overall, in the case that there are two subjects/parties involved (my cousin and I) and more than two objects (4 parents total, 2 each), how can I make myself clear?

Many thanks for your answers.

Before you read on, I just want to let you know that this question is one that relates to the balance of logic and grammar.

So I know that are multiple ways to describe a first-cousin relationship. I have heard people say 'We share the same grandparents'/'He/she is the child of my aunt/uncle.'or even just 'we are first cousins'.

However, I came across an interesting situation when I tried to rephrase'One of my parents and one of his/her parents are siblings.' (Which I find wordy and repetitive) whilst still maintaining the focus on parents. When I tried rewording it like this :

  • One of our parents are siblings. (Don't even think this is grammatically correct as the verb doesn't agree with the subject).

It turned out to be ambiguous, as though I am talking about only ONE parent instead of ONE PARENT ON BOTH SIDES. If I change that to:

  • One of both of our parents are siblings.

It sounds very awkward and equally unclear. I remember coming across a English grammar article a long time ago describing a similar case, but have long forgot if there is a proper term for this kind of ambiguity. To further elaborate on my question, to say:

  • Both of our parents are siblings.

Would also be open to more than one interpretations. What about:

  • One parents from each side are siblings (or should I say "is siblings")

Overall, in the case that there are two subjects/parties involved (my cousin and I) and more than two objects (4 parents total, 2 each), how can I make myself clear?

Many thanks for your answers.

5 added 8 characters in body
source | link

Before you read on, I just want to let you know that this question is one that relates to the balance of logic and grammar.

So I know that are multiple ways to describe a first-cousin relationship. I have heard people say 'We share the same grandparents' or 'He/'He/she is the child of my aunt/uncle.' Both of these'or even just 'we are very natural and trip off the tonguefirst cousins'.  

However, I can't think of a better waycame across an interesting situation when I tried to rephrase 'Onerephrase'One of my parents and one of his/her parents are siblings.' (Which I find wordy and repetitive) whilst still maintaining the focus on parents. When I tried wordingrewording it like this :

  • One of our parents are siblings. (Don't even think this is grammatically correct as the verb doesn't agree with the subject).

It turned out to be ambiguous, as though I am talking about only ONE parent instead of ONE PARENT ON BOTH SIDES. If I change that to:

  • One of both of our parents are siblings.

It sounds very awkward and equally unclear. I remember coming across a English grammar article a long time ago describing a similar case, but have long forgot if there is a proper term for this kind of ambiguity. To further elaborate on my question, to say:

  • Both of our parents are siblings.

Would also be open to more than one interpretations.

Overall, in the case that there are two subjects/parties involved (my cousin and I) and more than two objects (4 parents total, 2 each), how can I make myself clear?

Many thanks for your answers.

So I know that are multiple ways to describe a first-cousin relationship. I have heard people say 'We share the same grandparents' or 'He/she is the child of my aunt/uncle.' Both of these are very natural and trip off the tongue.  

However, I can't think of a better way to rephrase 'One of my parents and one of his/her parents are siblings.' (Which I find wordy and repetitive) When I tried wording it like this :

  • One of our parents are siblings. (Don't even think this is grammatically correct as the verb doesn't agree with the subject).

It turned out to be ambiguous, as though I am talking about only ONE parent instead of ONE PARENT ON BOTH SIDES. If I change that to:

  • One of both of our parents are siblings.

It sounds very awkward and equally unclear. I remember coming across a English grammar article a long time ago describing a similar case, but have long forgot if there is a proper term for this kind of ambiguity. To further elaborate on my question, to say:

  • Both of our parents are siblings.

Would also be open to more than one interpretations.

Overall, in the case that there are two subjects/parties involved (my cousin and I) and more than two objects (4 parents total, 2 each), how can I make myself clear?

Before you read on, I just want to let you know that this question is one that relates to the balance of logic and grammar.

So I know that are multiple ways to describe a first-cousin relationship. I have heard people say 'We share the same grandparents'/'He/she is the child of my aunt/uncle.'or even just 'we are first cousins'.

However, I came across an interesting situation when I tried to rephrase'One of my parents and one of his/her parents are siblings.' (Which I find wordy and repetitive) whilst still maintaining the focus on parents. When I tried rewording it like this :

  • One of our parents are siblings. (Don't even think this is grammatically correct as the verb doesn't agree with the subject).

It turned out to be ambiguous, as though I am talking about only ONE parent instead of ONE PARENT ON BOTH SIDES. If I change that to:

  • One of both of our parents are siblings.

It sounds very awkward and equally unclear. I remember coming across a English grammar article a long time ago describing a similar case, but have long forgot if there is a proper term for this kind of ambiguity. To further elaborate on my question, to say:

  • Both of our parents are siblings.

Would also be open to more than one interpretations.

Overall, in the case that there are two subjects/parties involved (my cousin and I) and more than two objects (4 parents total, 2 each), how can I make myself clear?

Many thanks for your answers.

4 added 8 characters in body
source | link

So I know that are multiple ways to describe a first-cousin relationship. I have heard people say 'We share the same grandparents' or 'He/she is the child of my aunt/uncle.' Both of these are very natural and trip off the tongue.

However, I can't think of a better way to rephrase 'One of my parents and one of his/her parents are siblings.' (Which I find wordy and repetitive) When I tried wording it like this :

  • One of our parents are siblings. (Don't even think this is grammatically correct as the verb doesn't agree with the subject).

It turned out to be ambiguous, as though I am talking about only ONE parent instead of ONE PARENT ON BOTH SIDES. If I change that to:

  • One of both of our parents are siblings.

It sounds very awkward and equally unclear. I remember coming across a English grammar article a long time ago describing a similar case, but have long forgot if there is a proper term for this kind of ambiguity. To further elaborate on my question, to say:

  • Both of our parents are siblings.

Would also be open to more than one interpretations.

Overall, in the case that there are two subjects/parties involved (my cousin and I) and more than two objects (4 parents total, 2 each), how can I make myself clear?

So I know that are multiple ways to describe a first-cousin relationship. I have heard people say 'We share the same grandparents' or 'He/she is the child of my aunt/uncle.' Both of these are very natural and trip off the tongue.

However, I can't think of a better way to rephrase 'One of my parents and one of his/her parents are siblings.' (Which I find wordy and repetitive) When I tried wording it like this :

  • One of our parents are siblings. (Don't even think this is grammatically correct as the verb doesn't agree with the subject).

It turned out to be ambiguous, as though I am talking about only ONE parent instead of ONE PARENT ON BOTH SIDES. If I change that to:

  • One of both of our parents are siblings.

It sounds very awkward and equally unclear. I remember coming across a English grammar article a long time ago describing a similar case, but have long forgot if there is a proper term for this kind of ambiguity. To further elaborate on my question, to say:

  • Both of our parents are siblings.

Would also be open to more than one interpretations.

Overall, in the case that there are two subjects involved (my cousin and I) and more than two objects (4 parents total, 2 each), how can I make myself clear?

So I know that are multiple ways to describe a first-cousin relationship. I have heard people say 'We share the same grandparents' or 'He/she is the child of my aunt/uncle.' Both of these are very natural and trip off the tongue.

However, I can't think of a better way to rephrase 'One of my parents and one of his/her parents are siblings.' (Which I find wordy and repetitive) When I tried wording it like this :

  • One of our parents are siblings. (Don't even think this is grammatically correct as the verb doesn't agree with the subject).

It turned out to be ambiguous, as though I am talking about only ONE parent instead of ONE PARENT ON BOTH SIDES. If I change that to:

  • One of both of our parents are siblings.

It sounds very awkward and equally unclear. I remember coming across a English grammar article a long time ago describing a similar case, but have long forgot if there is a proper term for this kind of ambiguity. To further elaborate on my question, to say:

  • Both of our parents are siblings.

Would also be open to more than one interpretations.

Overall, in the case that there are two subjects/parties involved (my cousin and I) and more than two objects (4 parents total, 2 each), how can I make myself clear?

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