7 replaced http://english.stackexchange.com/ with https://english.stackexchange.com/
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The most common punctuation error, universally accepted to be an error, is plenken. That is, adding an inappropriate space before the punctuation mark, which does not exist in Englishdoes not exist in English.

The most common punctuation error, universally accepted to be an error, is plenken. That is, adding an inappropriate space before the punctuation mark, which does not exist in English.

The most common punctuation error, universally accepted to be an error, is plenken. That is, adding an inappropriate space before the punctuation mark, which does not exist in English.

6 I changed "replaces" to "transposes" in the spoonerism definition.
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"foon speeding" is a classic example of spoonerism, where your mind replacestransposes segments of words or phrases.

"foon speeding" is a classic example of spoonerism, where your mind replaces segments of words or phrases.

"foon speeding" is a classic example of spoonerism, where your mind transposes segments of words or phrases.

5 very minor fixes/clarification
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There are a multitude of ways we can approach this. There are a lot of classifications and labels for things that can be reasonably marked as wrong in language. For instance, an error might happen in speech, or it could happen in writing. It might happen more often in informal contexts, or in formal ones prone to hypercorrection. Some errors appear everywhere.

Phonological errors

Morphosyntactic (Grammatical)or Grammatical errors

The sentence above is wrong (ungrammatical) because "correct" belongs to the category of adjectives and it can't directly modify a verb like "write". Also after modal verbs like "can", we should always use a non-inflected basic form of the verb, and "knows" there is at the very least non-standard.

Semantic errors (errors of logic or meaning)

Pragmatic errors

There are a multitude of ways we can approach this. There are a lot of classifications and labels for things that can be reasonably marked as wrong in language. For instance, an error might happen in speech, or writing. It might happen more often in informal contexts, or in formal ones prone to hypercorrection. Some errors appear everywhere.

Phonological

Morphosyntactic (Grammatical)

The sentence above is wrong (ungrammatical) because "correct" belongs to the category of adjectives and it can't directly modify a verb like "write". Also after modal verbs like "can", we should always use a non-inflected basic form of the verb and "knows" there is at the very least non-standard.

Semantic

Pragmatic

There are a multitude of ways we can approach this. There are a lot of classifications and labels for things that can be reasonably marked as wrong in language. For instance, an error might happen in speech or it could happen in writing. It might happen more often in informal contexts or in formal ones prone to hypercorrection. Some errors appear everywhere.

Phonological errors

Morphosyntactic or Grammatical errors

The sentence above is wrong (ungrammatical) because "correct" belongs to the category of adjectives and it can't directly modify a verb like "write". Also after modal verbs like "can", we should always use a non-inflected basic form of the verb, and "knows" is at the very least non-standard.

Semantic errors (errors of logic or meaning)

Pragmatic errors

4 deleted 6 characters in body
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3 added 55 characters in body
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2 added 2 characters in body
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1
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