3 more information on the usage of the possessive 's
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First of all, both forms are correct. In American English they are certainly correct, but...

There are people—usually British—who'd say you cannot use the possessive 's with non-living things and can use only that with people.

For example I have a book, the New English File Elementary Student's Book, which teaches the so called Oxfordian English. In it on page 124 it has examples explaining how to use the possessive 's. Basically what it says is that you use it with people but don't use it with things. There's nothing about proper names and if you think about it, an object with a proper name is still a non-living thing.

According to that logic only the first from both of your examples are correct. I don't know how strictly people from the UK follow this rule but I know from experience that inBut since not even the USUniversity of Oxford Style Guide says such things (it says "Use ’s after singular nouns, plural nouns which do not end in s and indefinite pronouns"), it doesn't really matter, it's up to you but keep your sentence clear and stay consistent.

First of all, both forms are correct. In American English they are certainly correct, but...

There are people—usually British—who'd say you cannot use the possessive 's with non-living things and can use only that with people.

For example I have a book, the New English File Elementary Student's Book, which teaches the so called Oxfordian English. In it on page 124 it has examples explaining how to use the possessive 's. Basically what it says is that you use it with people but don't use it with things. There's nothing about proper names and if you think about it, an object with a proper name is still a non-living thing.

According to that logic only the first from both of your examples are correct. I don't know how strictly people from the UK follow this rule but I know from experience that in the US it doesn't really matter, it's up to you but keep your sentence clear and stay consistent.

First of all, both forms are correct. In American English they are certainly correct, but...

There are people—usually British—who'd say you cannot use the possessive 's with non-living things and can use only that with people.

For example I have a book, the New English File Elementary Student's Book, which teaches the so called Oxfordian English. In it on page 124 it has examples explaining how to use the possessive 's. Basically what it says is that you use it with people but don't use it with things. There's nothing about proper names and if you think about it, an object with a proper name is still a non-living thing.

According to that logic only the first from both of your examples are correct. But since not even the University of Oxford Style Guide says such things (it says "Use ’s after singular nouns, plural nouns which do not end in s and indefinite pronouns"), it doesn't really matter, it's up to you but keep your sentence clear and stay consistent.

2 added 5 characters in body
source | link

First of all, both forms are correct. In American English they are certainly correct, but...

There are people—usually British—who'd say you cannot use the possessive 's with non-living things and can use only that with people.

For example I have a book, the New English File Elementary Student's Book, which teaches the so called Oxfordian English. In it on page 124 it has examples explaining how to use the possessive 's. Basically what it says is that you use it with people but don't use it with things. There's nothing about proper names and if you think about it, an object with a proper name is still a non-living thing.

According to that logic only the first from both of your examples are correct. I don't know how strictly people from the UK follow this rule but I know from experience that in the US it doesn't really matter, it's up to you but keep your sentence clear and stay consistent.

First of all, both forms are correct. In American English they are certainly correct, but...

There are people—usually British—who'd say you cannot use the possessive 's with non-living things and can use only that with people.

For example I have a book, the New English File Elementary Student's Book, which teaches the so called Oxfordian English. In it on page 124 it has examples explaining how to use the possessive 's. Basically what it says is that you use it with people but don't use it with things. There's nothing about proper names and if you think about it, an object with a proper name is still a non-living thing.

According to that logic only the first from both of your examples are correct. I don't know how strictly people from the UK follow this rule but I know from experience that in the US it doesn't really matter, it's up to you but keep your sentence clear and consistent.

First of all, both forms are correct. In American English they are certainly correct, but...

There are people—usually British—who'd say you cannot use the possessive 's with non-living things and can use only that with people.

For example I have a book, the New English File Elementary Student's Book, which teaches the so called Oxfordian English. In it on page 124 it has examples explaining how to use the possessive 's. Basically what it says is that you use it with people but don't use it with things. There's nothing about proper names and if you think about it, an object with a proper name is still a non-living thing.

According to that logic only the first from both of your examples are correct. I don't know how strictly people from the UK follow this rule but I know from experience that in the US it doesn't really matter, it's up to you but keep your sentence clear and stay consistent.

1
source | link

First of all, both forms are correct. In American English they are certainly correct, but...

There are people—usually British—who'd say you cannot use the possessive 's with non-living things and can use only that with people.

For example I have a book, the New English File Elementary Student's Book, which teaches the so called Oxfordian English. In it on page 124 it has examples explaining how to use the possessive 's. Basically what it says is that you use it with people but don't use it with things. There's nothing about proper names and if you think about it, an object with a proper name is still a non-living thing.

According to that logic only the first from both of your examples are correct. I don't know how strictly people from the UK follow this rule but I know from experience that in the US it doesn't really matter, it's up to you but keep your sentence clear and consistent.