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3 Blew away fluff; made tags more accurate
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I know everything.

  

They know all of their pen pals./ They know all the fathers of the family here.

My question is a grammar question, not about word usage. Please read the question, and answer only about this point (I don't need a link about how to use "everything"/"all", it's not the question). Please try to understand my question before marking it duplicate, I insist, because many people like to read half of the question, and mark it as duplicate when there's a common concept with another question.

The precise question is:

I think "everything" is an indefinite pronoun, and "all" is also an indefinite pronoun, so what makes in grammar that one is always used with a nominal group, and the other one doesn't accept a nominal group.

What are the different categories of indefinite pronouns in grammar, and what are the linguistic concepts making them used with a different grammar structure? Like it's the case here with "all" and "everything"? Being from the same grammatical group, what makes their difference in the linguistic theory?

PS: there are no tags for "indefinite pronouns" and "linguistic"?(This is a grammar question, not about word usage of "everything"/"all".)

I know everything.

 

They know all of their pen pals./ They know all the fathers of the family here.

My question is a grammar question, not about word usage. Please read the question, and answer only about this point (I don't need a link about how to use "everything"/"all", it's not the question). Please try to understand my question before marking it duplicate, I insist, because many people like to read half of the question, and mark it as duplicate when there's a common concept with another question.

The precise question is:

I think "everything" is an indefinite pronoun, and "all" is also an indefinite pronoun, so what makes in grammar that one is always used with a nominal group, and the other one doesn't accept a nominal group.

What are the different categories of indefinite pronouns in grammar, and what are the linguistic concepts making them used with a different grammar structure? Like it's the case here with "all" and "everything"? Being from the same grammatical group, what makes their difference in the linguistic theory?

PS: there are no tags for "indefinite pronouns" and "linguistic"?

I know everything.

 

They know all of their pen pals./ They know all the fathers of the family here.

I think "everything" is an indefinite pronoun, and "all" is also an indefinite pronoun, so what makes in grammar that one is always used with a nominal group, and the other one doesn't accept a nominal group.

What are the different categories of indefinite pronouns in grammar, and what are the linguistic concepts making them used with a different grammar structure? Like it's the case here with "all" and "everything"? Being from the same grammatical group, what makes their difference in the linguistic theory?

(This is a grammar question, not about word usage of "everything"/"all".)

2 corrected grammar and punctuation
source | link

I know everything.

They know all of their pen pals./ They know all the fathers of the family here.

My question is a grammar question, not about word usage. Please read the question, and answer only about this point (I don't need a link about how to use everything"everything"/all"all", it's not the question). Please try to understand my question before marking it duplicate, I insist, because many people likeslike to read half of the question, and mark it as duplicate when there's a common concept with another question.

The precise question is:

I think "everything" is an indefinite pronoun, and "all" is also an indefinite pronoun, so what makes in grammar that one is always used with a nominal group, and the other one doesn't accept a nominal group.

What are the different categories of indefinite pronouns in grammar, and what are the linguistic conceptconcepts making them used with a different grammar structure.? Like it's the case here with "all" and "everything"? Being from the same grammatical group, what makes their difference in the linguistic theory?

PS: there are no tags for "indefinite pronouns" and "linguistic"?

I know everything.

They know all of their pen pals/ They know all the fathers of the family here.

My question is a grammar question, not about usage. Please read the question, and answer only about this point (I don't need a link about how to use everything/all, it's not the question). Please try to understand my question before marking it duplicate, I insist, because many people likes to read half of the question, and mark as duplicate when there's a common concept with another question.

The precise question is:

I think "everything" is an indefinite pronoun, and "all" is also an indefinite pronoun, so what makes in grammar that one is always used with a nominal group, and the other doesn't accept a nominal group.

What are the different categories of indefinite pronouns in grammar, and what are the linguistic concept making them used with a different grammar structure. Like it's the case here with "all" and "everything"? Being from the same grammatical group, what makes their difference in the linguistic theory?

PS: there are no tags for "indefinite pronouns" and "linguistic"?

I know everything.

They know all of their pen pals./ They know all the fathers of the family here.

My question is a grammar question, not about word usage. Please read the question, and answer only about this point (I don't need a link about how to use "everything"/"all", it's not the question). Please try to understand my question before marking it duplicate, I insist, because many people like to read half of the question, and mark it as duplicate when there's a common concept with another question.

The precise question is:

I think "everything" is an indefinite pronoun, and "all" is also an indefinite pronoun, so what makes in grammar that one is always used with a nominal group, and the other one doesn't accept a nominal group.

What are the different categories of indefinite pronouns in grammar, and what are the linguistic concepts making them used with a different grammar structure? Like it's the case here with "all" and "everything"? Being from the same grammatical group, what makes their difference in the linguistic theory?

PS: there are no tags for "indefinite pronouns" and "linguistic"?

1
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The categories of indefinite pronouns

I know everything.

They know all of their pen pals/ They know all the fathers of the family here.

My question is a grammar question, not about usage. Please read the question, and answer only about this point (I don't need a link about how to use everything/all, it's not the question). Please try to understand my question before marking it duplicate, I insist, because many people likes to read half of the question, and mark as duplicate when there's a common concept with another question.

The precise question is:

I think "everything" is an indefinite pronoun, and "all" is also an indefinite pronoun, so what makes in grammar that one is always used with a nominal group, and the other doesn't accept a nominal group.

What are the different categories of indefinite pronouns in grammar, and what are the linguistic concept making them used with a different grammar structure. Like it's the case here with "all" and "everything"? Being from the same grammatical group, what makes their difference in the linguistic theory?

PS: there are no tags for "indefinite pronouns" and "linguistic"?