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2 Further clarifcation.
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This is either very literary, or quite old, and in several respects not what you would expect to find in a modern work:

  • "as" here means "for example"

  • "in the great sense" means "in"intrpreting the word 'reformer' in a broad sense", or "understood broadly".

  • I have no ideaIt is not clear what "and men" means here. The only sense I can get is in contradistinction to women, but that doesn't really make much sense eitherthink it must be "and ordinary men".

  • "So" means "therefore". It is a conjunction that applies to the whole clause, not just the following word.

Edit: OK, it's Thoreau. It can't mean men vs. women. I think "men" must mean "ordinary men", but that would not be a possible readingClarified further in a modern workresponse to Leon Zero's comments and addition of context.

This is either very literary, or quite old, and in several respects not what you would expect to find in a modern work:

  • "as" here means "for example"

  • "in the great sense" means "in a broad sense", or "understood broadly".

  • I have no idea what "and men" means here. The only sense I can get is in contradistinction to women, but that doesn't really make much sense either.

  • "So" means "therefore".

Edit: OK, it's Thoreau. It can't mean men vs. women. I think "men" must mean "ordinary men", but that would not be a possible reading in a modern work.

This is quite old, and in several respects not what you would expect to find in a modern work:

  • "as" here means "for example"

  • "in the great sense" means "intrpreting the word 'reformer' in a broad sense".

  • It is not clear what "and men" means here. I think it must be "and ordinary men".

  • "So" means "therefore". It is a conjunction that applies to the whole clause, not just the following word.

Edit: Clarified further in response to Leon Zero's comments and addition of context.

1
source | link

This is either very literary, or quite old, and in several respects not what you would expect to find in a modern work:

  • "as" here means "for example"

  • "in the great sense" means "in a broad sense", or "understood broadly".

  • I have no idea what "and men" means here. The only sense I can get is in contradistinction to women, but that doesn't really make much sense either.

  • "So" means "therefore".

Edit: OK, it's Thoreau. It can't mean men vs. women. I think "men" must mean "ordinary men", but that would not be a possible reading in a modern work.