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2 making grammar/english corrections as per request from author
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Putting athe proper article before a noun is really complex. To be frank, I'm still learning this! I don't remember the source, but I had read somewhere that even students of English Literature domake mistakes in placing proper articles in their sentences.

Even more confusing is the usage of these articles is while describing the natural things. I am taught puttingto put the article the for natural things (the sun, the moon, the earth etc.), as they are the only ones.

Now why does Harvard describes it as The Himalaya here whereas Britannica calls it Himalaya here? Smart Wiki calls it both here in its main article and about Ecology of The Himalaya here!

My question is:

Do we have to place the while describing the natural things like mountains and rivers? And if the answer is no, why? When I talk about Mount Everest, it's the Mount Everest, the only one. It's definite and so the is needed.

HasDoes it have something to do with being 'plural' (as in the range of Himalayas so it's The Himalayas)? But then I watched The Nile on Discovery!

A request: Please point out mistakes ofin placing articles in this question as well. This'll be the bonus for me! :)

Putting a proper article before noun is really complex. To be frank, I'm still learning this! I don't remember the source but I had read somewhere that even students of English Literature do mistakes in placing proper articles in their sentences.

Even confusing the usage of these articles is while describing the natural things. I am taught putting the article the for natural things (the sun, the moon, the earth etc.), as they are the only ones.

Now why Harvard describes it as The Himalaya here whereas Britannica calls it Himalaya here? Smart Wiki calls it both here in its main article and about Ecology of The Himalaya here!

My question is:

Do we have to place the while describing the natural things like mountains and rivers? And if the answer is no, why? When I talk about Mount Everest, it's the Mount Everest, the only one. It's definite and so the is needed.

Has it something to do with 'plural' (as in the range of Himalayas so it's The Himalayas)? But then I watched The Nile on Discovery!

A request: Please point out mistakes of placing articles in this question as well. This'll be the bonus for me! :)

Putting the proper article before a noun is really complex. To be frank, I'm still learning this! I don't remember the source, but I had read somewhere that even students of English Literature make mistakes in placing proper articles in their sentences.

Even more confusing is the usage of these articles while describing natural things. I am taught to put the article the for natural things (the sun, the moon, the earth etc.), as they are the only ones.

Now why does Harvard describes it as The Himalaya here whereas Britannica calls it Himalaya here? Smart Wiki calls it both here in its main article and about Ecology of The Himalaya here!

My question is:

Do we have to place the while describing the natural things like mountains and rivers? And if the answer is no, why? When I talk about Mount Everest, it's the Mount Everest, the only one. It's definite and so the is needed.

Does it have something to do with being 'plural' (as in the range of Himalayas so it's The Himalayas)? But then I watched The Nile on Discovery!

A request: Please point out mistakes in placing articles in this question as well. This'll be the bonus for me! :)

1
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The usage of the articles 'a' and 'the' for describing natural things

Putting a proper article before noun is really complex. To be frank, I'm still learning this! I don't remember the source but I had read somewhere that even students of English Literature do mistakes in placing proper articles in their sentences.

Even confusing the usage of these articles is while describing the natural things. I am taught putting the article the for natural things (the sun, the moon, the earth etc.), as they are the only ones.

Now why Harvard describes it as The Himalaya here whereas Britannica calls it Himalaya here? Smart Wiki calls it both here in its main article and about Ecology of The Himalaya here!

My question is:

Do we have to place the while describing the natural things like mountains and rivers? And if the answer is no, why? When I talk about Mount Everest, it's the Mount Everest, the only one. It's definite and so the is needed.

Has it something to do with 'plural' (as in the range of Himalayas so it's The Himalayas)? But then I watched The Nile on Discovery!

A request: Please point out mistakes of placing articles in this question as well. This'll be the bonus for me! :)