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A "missed call" is not very common in American usage.

We're more likely to say something like,

Hi, this is Anish, returning your call.

Or,

Hi, this is Anish, I'm sorry I missed your call.

If you don't know if you're talking to the person who called, you could say,

Could I speak to Jane? I'm returning her call.

Or if you don't know who called but only the number to call back,

I'm returning a call from this number.

Edit Regarding "missed call".

The meaning of this phrase is obvious (mostly, but see below) so you will not be misunderstood if you use it in America. However, telephone greetings are highly conventionalized, and the phrases I mentioned above are conventional expressions we use for the case you described. If "I got a missed call from this number" is conventional, it's conventional in an community that I'm not familiar with.

Google Ngrams also suggests that "returning your call" is a more common usage than "missed call":

enter image description here

Obviously there's a lot of room for error in that these two phrases can not fill the same grammatical function, and books are not the best place to look for phrases that are mainly used in telephone conversations. Maybe someone with better Ngram-foo can come along and give an improved comparison.

Also, according to Wikipedia, the term "missed call" is used specifically for cases where the caller deliberately hangs up before the call is answered to convey a simple message without being charged. I don't believe this usage is common in America either. But if you are in a place where this usage is common, you might not want to use the phrase when calling a potential employer because it implies stinginess on their part.

A "missed call" is not very common in American usage.

We're more likely to say something like,

Hi, this is Anish, returning your call.

Or,

Hi, this is Anish, I'm sorry I missed your call.

If you don't know if you're talking to the person who called, you could say,

Could I speak to Jane? I'm returning her call.

Or if you don't know who called but only the number to call back,

I'm returning a call from this number.

A "missed call" is not very common in American usage.

We're more likely to say something like,

Hi, this is Anish, returning your call.

Or,

Hi, this is Anish, I'm sorry I missed your call.

If you don't know if you're talking to the person who called, you could say,

Could I speak to Jane? I'm returning her call.

Or if you don't know who called but only the number to call back,

I'm returning a call from this number.

Edit Regarding "missed call".

The meaning of this phrase is obvious (mostly, but see below) so you will not be misunderstood if you use it in America. However, telephone greetings are highly conventionalized, and the phrases I mentioned above are conventional expressions we use for the case you described. If "I got a missed call from this number" is conventional, it's conventional in an community that I'm not familiar with.

Google Ngrams also suggests that "returning your call" is a more common usage than "missed call":

enter image description here

Obviously there's a lot of room for error in that these two phrases can not fill the same grammatical function, and books are not the best place to look for phrases that are mainly used in telephone conversations. Maybe someone with better Ngram-foo can come along and give an improved comparison.

Also, according to Wikipedia, the term "missed call" is used specifically for cases where the caller deliberately hangs up before the call is answered to convey a simple message without being charged. I don't believe this usage is common in America either. But if you are in a place where this usage is common, you might not want to use the phrase when calling a potential employer because it implies stinginess on their part.

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A "missed call" is not very common in American usage.

We're more likely to say something like,

Hi, this is Anish, returning your call.

Or,

Hi, this is Anish, I'm sorry I missed your call.

If you don't know if you're talking to the person who called, you could say,

Could I speak to Jane? I'm returning her call.

Or if you don't know who called but only the number to call back,

I'm returning a call from this number.