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All are bad. The sentence is a muddled jumble. B D is probably best.

To express similarity of flight...

The second pigeon flew just like the first.

The second pigeon flew just like the first pigeon flew.

To express concurrency of flight or as it's worded, flying.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon flew.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon was flying.

To express concurrency of taking to flight (i.e. going from perch to flight) use similar constructs. The use of "also" further reinforces concurrency over similarity.

The first pigeon took flight (or more commonly "took off") just as the second was [also] taking flight (taking off).

One pigeon took flight just as the other took flight.

The words "just as" create some confusion in your sentence since "just as" as you used it is more likely to express concurrency over similarity. Additionally, there is an issue with "flew". I think you mean "took flight". Your sentence as it's worded, however, tends to express similarity while using the concurrent form.

All are bad. The sentence is a muddled jumble. B is probably best.

To express similarity of flight...

The second pigeon flew just like the first.

The second pigeon flew just like the first pigeon flew.

To express concurrency of flight or as it's worded, flying.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon flew.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon was flying.

To express concurrency of taking to flight (i.e. going from perch to flight) use similar constructs. The use of "also" further reinforces concurrency over similarity.

The first pigeon took flight (or more commonly "took off") just as the second was [also] taking flight (taking off).

One pigeon took flight just as the other took flight.

The words "just as" create some confusion in your sentence since "just as" as you used it is more likely to express concurrency over similarity. Additionally, there is an issue with "flew". I think you mean "took flight". Your sentence as it's worded, however, tends to express similarity while using the concurrent form.

All are bad. The sentence is a muddled jumble. D is probably best.

To express similarity of flight...

The second pigeon flew just like the first.

The second pigeon flew just like the first pigeon flew.

To express concurrency of flight or as it's worded, flying.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon flew.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon was flying.

To express concurrency of taking to flight (i.e. going from perch to flight) use similar constructs. The use of "also" further reinforces concurrency over similarity.

The first pigeon took flight (or more commonly "took off") just as the second was [also] taking flight (taking off).

One pigeon took flight just as the other took flight.

The words "just as" create some confusion in your sentence since "just as" as you used it is more likely to express concurrency over similarity. Additionally, there is an issue with "flew". I think you mean "took flight". Your sentence as it's worded, however, tends to express similarity while using the concurrent form.

3 added 233 characters in body
source | link

All are bad. The sentence is a muddled jumble. B is probably best.

To express similarity of flight...

The second pigeon flew just like the first.

The second pigeon flew just like the first pigeon flew.

To express concurrency of flight or as it's worded, flying.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon flew.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon was flying.

To express concurrency of taking to flight (i.e. going from perch to flight) use similar constructs. The use of "also" further reinforces concurrency over similarity.

The first pigeon took flight (or more commonly "took off") just as the second was [also] taking flight (taking off).

One pigeon took flight just as the other took flight.

The words "just as" create some confusion in your sentence since "just as" as you used it is more likely to express concurrency over similarity. Additionally, there is an issue with "flew". I think you mean "took flight". Your sentence as it's worded, however, tends to express similarity while using the concurrent form.

All are bad. The sentence is a muddled jumble. B is probably best.

To express similarity of flight...

The second pigeon flew just like the first.

The second pigeon flew just like the first pigeon flew.

To express concurrency of flight or as it's worded, flying.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon flew.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon was flying.

To express concurrency of taking to flight (i.e. going from perch to flight)

The first pigeon took flight (or more commonly "took off") just as the second was taking flight (taking off).

One pigeon took flight just as the other took flight.

The words "just as" create some confusion in your sentence since "just as" as you used it is more likely to express concurrency over similarity. Additionally, there is an issue with "flew". I think you mean "took flight". Your sentence as it's worded, however, tends to express similarity while using the concurrent form.

All are bad. The sentence is a muddled jumble. B is probably best.

To express similarity of flight...

The second pigeon flew just like the first.

The second pigeon flew just like the first pigeon flew.

To express concurrency of flight or as it's worded, flying.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon flew.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon was flying.

To express concurrency of taking to flight (i.e. going from perch to flight) use similar constructs. The use of "also" further reinforces concurrency over similarity.

The first pigeon took flight (or more commonly "took off") just as the second was [also] taking flight (taking off).

One pigeon took flight just as the other took flight.

The words "just as" create some confusion in your sentence since "just as" as you used it is more likely to express concurrency over similarity. Additionally, there is an issue with "flew". I think you mean "took flight". Your sentence as it's worded, however, tends to express similarity while using the concurrent form.

2 added 233 characters in body
source | link

All are bad. The sentence is a muddled jumble.   B is probably best.

To express similarity of flight...

The second pigeon flew just like the first.

The second pigeon flew just like the first pigeon flew.

To express concurrency of flight or as it's worded, flying.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon flew.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon was flying.

To express concurrency of taking to flight (i.e. going from perch to flight)

The first pigeon took flight (or more commonly "took off") just as the second was taking flight (taking off).

One pigeon took flight just as the other took flight.

The words "just as" create some confusion in your sentence since "just as" as you used it is more likely to express concurrency over similarity. Additionally, there is an issue with "flew". I think you mean "took flight". Your sentence as it's worded, however, tends to express similarity while using the concurrent form.

All are bad. The sentence is a muddled jumble.  

To express similarity of flight...

The second pigeon flew just like the first.

To express concurrency of flight or as it's worded, flying.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon flew.

To express concurrency of taking to flight (i.e. going from perch to flight)

One pigeon took flight just as the other took flight.

The words "just as" create some confusion in your sentence since "just as" as you used it is more likely to express concurrency over similarity. Additionally, there is an issue with "flew". I think you mean "took flight". Your sentence as it's worded, however, tends to express similarity while using the concurrent form.

All are bad. The sentence is a muddled jumble. B is probably best.

To express similarity of flight...

The second pigeon flew just like the first.

The second pigeon flew just like the first pigeon flew.

To express concurrency of flight or as it's worded, flying.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon flew.

The second pigeon flew while the first pigeon was flying.

To express concurrency of taking to flight (i.e. going from perch to flight)

The first pigeon took flight (or more commonly "took off") just as the second was taking flight (taking off).

One pigeon took flight just as the other took flight.

The words "just as" create some confusion in your sentence since "just as" as you used it is more likely to express concurrency over similarity. Additionally, there is an issue with "flew". I think you mean "took flight". Your sentence as it's worded, however, tends to express similarity while using the concurrent form.

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