2 deleted 89 characters in body
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Oxford dictionary also lists the two related but nevertheless different meanings:

1 Be a sign that (something) is about to happen.

1.1 Acclaim.

To acclaim means to praise. And you're right, definitions 1 and 2 are not identical. And sometimes you can both praise something and announce its coming, so both meanings can be in effect at the same time.

To me the author's intention is unclear. And here's why: Göran Therborn is a highly educated academic and chairs the Department of Sociology at Cambridge University. But none of this means he is a good writer. And part of being a good writer is word choice. In addition, as far as I can tell Mr Therborn is not a native speaker of English, which may or may not contribute to his making some poor word choices in this article.

The other word you asked about in the ELU version of this question, rupture is not the best word to use here. Perhaps his mind was outrunning his pencil, pen, word processor, or whatever he writes with, but it's not clear to what rupture refers to. Readers can only guess and surmise, which is something good authors usually don't want their readers to have to do in a formal essay of this type.

When it comes to Rerum Novarum herald(ing) the "rupture" I can't be sure what Mr Therborn means. If you know anything about Rerum Novarum or its history--or actually read it--you can see that it does a bit of both praising and predicting, as well as a lot of critiquing.

Other word choices in Mr Therborn's piece (and I haven't read the whole thing) that struck me as particular include the following:

Bolivia’s miners played a central role in the Revolution of 1952, and when tin production collapsed in the 1980s, the organizing skills of those obliged to seek work elsewhere provided Evo Morales and his coca growers with a spine of disciplined cadres.

Unless the word spine is used in academic British English in a way I'm unfamiliar with, it doesn't seem like a word a good writer would use here.

The right of wage-workers to organize and bargain collectively was another major gain of the post-war conjuncture.

In short, the language used inNot the essay is clunkybest word here.

Oxford dictionary also lists the two related but nevertheless different meanings:

1 Be a sign that (something) is about to happen.

1.1 Acclaim.

To acclaim means to praise. And you're right, definitions 1 and 2 are not identical. And sometimes you can both praise something and announce its coming, so both meanings can be in effect at the same time.

To me the author's intention is unclear. And here's why: Göran Therborn is a highly educated academic and chairs the Department of Sociology at Cambridge University. But none of this means he is a good writer. And part of being a good writer is word choice. In addition, as far as I can tell Mr Therborn is not a native speaker of English, which may or may not contribute to his making some poor word choices in this article.

The other word you asked about in the ELU version of this question, rupture is not the best word to use here. Perhaps his mind was outrunning his pencil, pen, word processor, or whatever he writes with, but it's not clear to what rupture refers to. Readers can only guess and surmise, which is something good authors usually don't want their readers to have to do in a formal essay of this type.

When it comes to Rerum Novarum herald(ing) the "rupture" I can't be sure what Mr Therborn means. If you know anything about Rerum Novarum or its history--or actually read it--you can see that it does a bit of both praising and predicting, as well as a lot of critiquing.

Other word choices in Mr Therborn's piece (and I haven't read the whole thing) that struck me as particular include the following:

Bolivia’s miners played a central role in the Revolution of 1952, and when tin production collapsed in the 1980s, the organizing skills of those obliged to seek work elsewhere provided Evo Morales and his coca growers with a spine of disciplined cadres.

Unless the word spine is used in academic British English in a way I'm unfamiliar with, it doesn't seem like a word a good writer would use here.

The right of wage-workers to organize and bargain collectively was another major gain of the post-war conjuncture.

In short, the language used in the essay is clunky.

Oxford dictionary also lists the two related but nevertheless different meanings:

1 Be a sign that (something) is about to happen.

1.1 Acclaim.

To acclaim means to praise. And you're right, definitions 1 and 2 are not identical. And sometimes you can both praise something and announce its coming, so both meanings can be in effect at the same time.

To me the author's intention is unclear. And here's why: Göran Therborn is a highly educated academic and chairs the Department of Sociology at Cambridge University. But none of this means he is a good writer. And part of being a good writer is word choice. In addition, as far as I can tell Mr Therborn is not a native speaker of English, which may or may not contribute to his making some poor word choices in this article.

The other word you asked about in the ELU version of this question, rupture is not the best word to use here. Perhaps his mind was outrunning his pencil, pen, word processor, or whatever he writes with, but it's not clear to what rupture refers to. Readers can only guess and surmise, which is something good authors usually don't want their readers to have to do in a formal essay of this type.

When it comes to Rerum Novarum herald(ing) the "rupture" I can't be sure what Mr Therborn means. If you know anything about Rerum Novarum or its history--or actually read it--you can see that it does a bit of both praising and predicting, as well as a lot of critiquing.

Other word choices in Mr Therborn's piece (and I haven't read the whole thing) that struck me as particular include the following:

Bolivia’s miners played a central role in the Revolution of 1952, and when tin production collapsed in the 1980s, the organizing skills of those obliged to seek work elsewhere provided Evo Morales and his coca growers with a spine of disciplined cadres.

Unless the word spine is used in academic British English in a way I'm unfamiliar with, it doesn't seem like a word a good writer would use here.

The right of wage-workers to organize and bargain collectively was another major gain of the post-war conjuncture.

Not the best word here.

1
source | link

Oxford dictionary also lists the two related but nevertheless different meanings:

1 Be a sign that (something) is about to happen.

1.1 Acclaim.

To acclaim means to praise. And you're right, definitions 1 and 2 are not identical. And sometimes you can both praise something and announce its coming, so both meanings can be in effect at the same time.

To me the author's intention is unclear. And here's why: Göran Therborn is a highly educated academic and chairs the Department of Sociology at Cambridge University. But none of this means he is a good writer. And part of being a good writer is word choice. In addition, as far as I can tell Mr Therborn is not a native speaker of English, which may or may not contribute to his making some poor word choices in this article.

The other word you asked about in the ELU version of this question, rupture is not the best word to use here. Perhaps his mind was outrunning his pencil, pen, word processor, or whatever he writes with, but it's not clear to what rupture refers to. Readers can only guess and surmise, which is something good authors usually don't want their readers to have to do in a formal essay of this type.

When it comes to Rerum Novarum herald(ing) the "rupture" I can't be sure what Mr Therborn means. If you know anything about Rerum Novarum or its history--or actually read it--you can see that it does a bit of both praising and predicting, as well as a lot of critiquing.

Other word choices in Mr Therborn's piece (and I haven't read the whole thing) that struck me as particular include the following:

Bolivia’s miners played a central role in the Revolution of 1952, and when tin production collapsed in the 1980s, the organizing skills of those obliged to seek work elsewhere provided Evo Morales and his coca growers with a spine of disciplined cadres.

Unless the word spine is used in academic British English in a way I'm unfamiliar with, it doesn't seem like a word a good writer would use here.

The right of wage-workers to organize and bargain collectively was another major gain of the post-war conjuncture.

In short, the language used in the essay is clunky.