4 added 651 characters in body
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That’s two adjectives! “Long” modifies “unused” and “unused” modifies “Windows”.

“Long” is being used in the 3rd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

3 a : extending over a considerable time

“Unused” is being used in the 2nd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

2 : not used, as b : not put to use : idle

Together they mean that the Windows operating system has not been put to use for a considerable time.


As for one-word alternatives to the cumulative adjective phrase “long unused”, “Dusty” can convey the same meaning metaphorically, assuming there are clues from context. The same goes for “rusty”, especially when referring to skills.  

“Dilapidated” works best for buildings but can be extended to other things via metaphor and will generally indicate a perceptible state of disrepair. “Decrepit” is similar, but will carry overtones of the infirmities that come with aging for imperfectly self-replicating organisms (such as ourselves). 

None of these necessarily conveys an especially long timeframe, and the latter two should be restricted to description ofdescribing things that have suffered diminished structural integrity or aesthetic quality from disuse. 

For the example sentence, I don’t think the substitution of any single word would add clarity.

That’s two adjectives! “Long” modifies “unused” and “unused” modifies “Windows”.

“Long” is being used in the 3rd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

3 a : extending over a considerable time

“Unused” is being used in the 2nd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

2 : not used, as b : not put to use : idle

Together they mean that the Windows operating system has not been put to use for a considerable time.


As for one-word alternatives to “long unused”, “Dusty” can convey the same meaning metaphorically, assuming there are clues from context. The same goes for “rusty”, especially when referring to skills. “Dilapidated” works best for buildings but can be extended to other things via metaphor and will generally indicate a perceptible state of disrepair. “Decrepit” is similar, but will carry overtones of the infirmities that come with aging for imperfectly self-replicating organisms (such as ourselves). None of these necessarily conveys an especially long timeframe, and the latter two should be restricted to description of things that have suffered diminished structural integrity or aesthetic quality from disuse. For the example sentence, I don’t think the substitution of any single word would add clarity.

As for one-word alternatives to the cumulative adjective phrase “long unused”, “Dusty” can convey the same meaning metaphorically, assuming there are clues from context. The same goes for “rusty”, especially when referring to skills.  

“Dilapidated” works best for buildings but can be extended to other things via metaphor and will generally indicate a perceptible state of disrepair. “Decrepit” is similar, but will carry overtones of the infirmities that come with aging for imperfectly self-replicating organisms (such as ourselves). 

None of these necessarily conveys an especially long timeframe, and the latter two should be restricted to describing things that have suffered diminished structural integrity or aesthetic quality from disuse. 

For the example sentence, I don’t think the substitution of any single word would add clarity.

3 added 651 characters in body
source | link

That’s two adjectives! “Long” modifies “unused” and “unused” modifies “Windows”.

“Long” is being used in the 3rd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

3 a : extending over a considerable time

“Unused” is being used in the 2nd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

2 : not used, as b : not put to use : idle

Together they mean that the Windows operating system has not been put to use for a considerable time.


As for one-word alternatives to “long unused”, “Dusty” can convey the same meaning metaphorically, assuming there are clues from context. The same goes for “rusty”, especially when referring to skills. “Dilapidated” works best for buildings but can be extended to other things via metaphor and will generally indicate a perceptible state of disrepair. “Decrepit” is similar, but will carry overtones of the infirmities that come with aging for imperfectly self-replicating organisms (such as ourselves). None of these necessarily conveys an especially long timeframe, and the latter two should be restricted to description of things that have suffered diminished structural integrity or aesthetic quality from disuse. For the example sentence, I don’t think anythe substitution of theseany single word would add clarity.

That’s two adjectives! “Long” modifies “unused” and “unused” modifies “Windows”.

“Long” is being used in the 3rd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

3 a : extending over a considerable time

“Unused” is being used in the 2nd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

2 : not used, as b : not put to use : idle

Together they mean that the Windows operating system has not been put to use for a considerable time.


As for one-word alternatives to “long unused”, “Dusty” can convey the same meaning metaphorically, assuming there are clues from context. The same goes for “rusty”, especially when referring to skills. “Dilapidated” works best for buildings but can be extended to other things via metaphor and will generally indicate a perceptible state of disrepair. “Decrepit” is similar, but will carry overtones of the infirmities that come with aging for imperfectly self-replicating organisms (such as ourselves). None of these necessarily conveys an especially long timeframe. For the example sentence, I don’t think any of these would add clarity.

That’s two adjectives! “Long” modifies “unused” and “unused” modifies “Windows”.

“Long” is being used in the 3rd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

3 a : extending over a considerable time

“Unused” is being used in the 2nd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

2 : not used, as b : not put to use : idle

Together they mean that the Windows operating system has not been put to use for a considerable time.


As for one-word alternatives to “long unused”, “Dusty” can convey the same meaning metaphorically, assuming there are clues from context. The same goes for “rusty”, especially when referring to skills. “Dilapidated” works best for buildings but can be extended to other things via metaphor and will generally indicate a perceptible state of disrepair. “Decrepit” is similar, but will carry overtones of the infirmities that come with aging for imperfectly self-replicating organisms (such as ourselves). None of these necessarily conveys an especially long timeframe, and the latter two should be restricted to description of things that have suffered diminished structural integrity or aesthetic quality from disuse. For the example sentence, I don’t think the substitution of any single word would add clarity.

2 added 651 characters in body
source | link

That’s two adjectives! “Long” modifies “unused” and “unused” modifies “Windows”.

“Long” is being used in the 3rd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

3 a : extending over a considerable time

“Unused” is being used in the 2nd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

2 : not used, as b : not put to use : idle

Together they mean that the Windows operating system has not been put to use for a considerable time.


As for one-word alternatives to “long unused”, “Dusty” can convey the same meaning metaphorically, assuming there are clues from context. The same goes for “rusty”, especially when referring to skills. “Dilapidated” works best for buildings but can be extended to other things via metaphor and will generally indicate a perceptible state of disrepair. “Decrepit” is similar, but will carry overtones of the infirmities that come with aging for imperfectly self-replicating organisms (such as ourselves). None of these necessarily conveys an especially long timeframe. For the example sentence, I don’t think any of these would add clarity.

That’s two adjectives! “Long” modifies “unused” and “unused” modifies “Windows”.

“Long” is being used in the 3rd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

3 a : extending over a considerable time

“Unused” is being used in the 2nd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

2 : not used, as b : not put to use : idle

Together they mean that the Windows operating system has not been put to use for a considerable time.

That’s two adjectives! “Long” modifies “unused” and “unused” modifies “Windows”.

“Long” is being used in the 3rd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

3 a : extending over a considerable time

“Unused” is being used in the 2nd sense listed in Merriam-Webster:

2 : not used, as b : not put to use : idle

Together they mean that the Windows operating system has not been put to use for a considerable time.


As for one-word alternatives to “long unused”, “Dusty” can convey the same meaning metaphorically, assuming there are clues from context. The same goes for “rusty”, especially when referring to skills. “Dilapidated” works best for buildings but can be extended to other things via metaphor and will generally indicate a perceptible state of disrepair. “Decrepit” is similar, but will carry overtones of the infirmities that come with aging for imperfectly self-replicating organisms (such as ourselves). None of these necessarily conveys an especially long timeframe. For the example sentence, I don’t think any of these would add clarity.

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