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It's a matter of style and good usage. It's generally agreed that of is not necessary after off in such sentences.

Chicago Manual of Style recommends this:

off. Never put of after this word {we got off the bus}.

Cambridge Grammar of the English Language says this:

Off licenses an of phrase only in AmE (%He fell off of the wall).

There's a limited amount of prepositions that select of as head of their complement: because, exclusive, irrespective, ii, abreast abreast, ahead, instead, regardless, upward(s), east, north, south, west, Ill, alongside, inside, out, outside. With off it's optional.

She took it out of the box

She pulled it off the shelf.

It's a matter of style and good usage. It's generally agreed that of is not necessary after off in such sentences.

Chicago Manual of Style recommends this:

off. Never put of after this word {we got off the bus}.

Cambridge Grammar of the English Language says this:

Off licenses an of phrase only in AmE (%He fell off of the wall).

There's a limited amount of prepositions that select of as head of their complement: because, exclusive, irrespective, ii, abreast, ahead, instead, regardless, upward(s), east, north, south, west, Ill, alongside, inside, out, outside. With off it's optional.

She took it out of the box

She pulled it off the shelf.

It's a matter of style and good usage. It's generally agreed that of is not necessary after off in such sentences.

Chicago Manual of Style recommends this:

off. Never put of after this word {we got off the bus}.

Cambridge Grammar of the English Language says this:

Off licenses an of phrase only in AmE (%He fell off of the wall).

There's a limited amount of prepositions that select of as head of their complement: because, exclusive, irrespective, abreast, ahead, instead, regardless, upward(s), east, north, south, west, alongside, inside, out, outside. With off it's optional.

She took it out of the box

She pulled it off the shelf.

1
source | link

It's a matter of style and good usage. It's generally agreed that of is not necessary after off in such sentences.

Chicago Manual of Style recommends this:

off. Never put of after this word {we got off the bus}.

Cambridge Grammar of the English Language says this:

Off licenses an of phrase only in AmE (%He fell off of the wall).

There's a limited amount of prepositions that select of as head of their complement: because, exclusive, irrespective, ii, abreast, ahead, instead, regardless, upward(s), east, north, south, west, Ill, alongside, inside, out, outside. With off it's optional.

She took it out of the box

She pulled it off the shelf.