Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackEnglishLL/status/412171554416758784
Please NOTE some the corrections I am consistently making to your questions, and ask them correctly henceforth. It's always "English", not "english", and you never put a space BEFORE a punctuation mark.. (No biggie if I change a verb or something; that's not in the same category.)
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J.R.
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If we say something that will likely to continue everyday and it starts from tomorrow, how should we say this ,:

Starting from tomorrow we will practice boxing at 5 o'clock.

Starting from tomorrow we will practice boxing at 5 o'clock.

or

From tomorrow on we will practice boxing at 5 o'clock

From tomorrow on we will practice boxing at 5 o'clock.

Which one thatwould a native englishEnglish speaker would choose or would be widely used  ?

If we say something that will likely to continue everyday and it starts from tomorrow, how should we say this ,

Starting from tomorrow we will practice boxing at 5 o'clock.

or

From tomorrow on we will practice boxing at 5 o'clock

Which one that a native english speaker would choose or would be widely used  ?

If we say something that will likely to continue everyday and it starts from tomorrow, how should we say this:

Starting from tomorrow we will practice boxing at 5 o'clock.

or

From tomorrow on we will practice boxing at 5 o'clock.

Which one would a native English speaker would choose or would be widely used?

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laruffii
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Starting from tomorrow vs From tomorrow on

If we say something that will likely to continue everyday and it starts from tomorrow, how should we say this ,

Starting from tomorrow we will practice boxing at 5 o'clock.

or

From tomorrow on we will practice boxing at 5 o'clock

Which one that a native english speaker would choose or would be widely used ?