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The proper latinLatin sentence for the common use meaning of Quid Pro Quo (I scratch your back, you scratch mine) would actually be "Do Ut Des"

Over the centuries "Qui pro Quo" that in Latin and in all modern "Romance" languages (Italian, Spanish, French...) indicates a misunderstanding, has become "Quid pro Quo" and the concept of substitution has become more of "a favour for a favour"."a favour for a favour". This has happened so long ago (possibly 500 years) that cannot be considered an error in translation (even though it is) but the accepted meaning, even in common law.

The proper latin sentence for the common use meaning of Quid Pro Quo (I scratch your back, you scratch mine) would actually be "Do Ut Des"

Over the centuries "Qui pro Quo" that in Latin and in all modern "Romance" languages (Italian, Spanish, French...) indicates a misunderstanding, has become "Quid pro Quo" and the concept of substitution has become more of "a favour for a favour". This has happened so long ago (possibly 500 years) that cannot be considered an error in translation (even though it is) but the accepted meaning, even in common law.

The proper Latin sentence for the common use meaning of Quid Pro Quo (I scratch your back, you scratch mine) would actually be "Do Ut Des"

Over the centuries "Qui pro Quo" that in Latin and in all modern "Romance" languages (Italian, Spanish, French...) indicates a misunderstanding, has become "Quid pro Quo" and the concept of substitution has become more of "a favour for a favour". This has happened so long ago (possibly 500 years) that cannot be considered an error in translation (even though it is) but the accepted meaning, even in common law.

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source | link

The proper latin sentence for the common use meaning of Quid Pro Quo (I scratch your back, you scratch mine) would actually be "Do Ut Des"

Over the centuries "Qui pro Quo" that in Latin and in all modern "Romance" languages (Italian, Spanish, French...) indicates a misunderstanding, has become "Quid pro Quo" and the concept of substitution has become more of "a favour for a favour". This has happened so long ago (possibly 500 years) that cannot be considered an error in translation (even though it is) but the accepted meaning, even in common law.