2 incorporated the defintion from Merriam-Webster so that visitors can understand your answer without leaving ELL. Corrected a typo. Formatting
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I don't think so. Merriam-Webster lists only one occurrencedefinition of "found" as a noun,: "free food and lodging in addition to wages" and it's not related to what you mentioned (i.e., being "a real bargain"). If I understood their definition of "found" as a noun correctly, it could be used in a sentence such as: "You'll get 100 bucks and a found for the job".

You'll get 100 bucks and a found for the job.

Perhaps saying "That house was a marvellousmarvelous/amazing/incredible finding!" would do, but this doesn't sound very natural to me. Maybe someone who knows better can chime in with a good expression. In any case, I strongly believe that "a found""a found" would be incorrect in the phrase you stated.

I don't think so. Merriam-Webster lists only one occurrence of "found" as a noun, and it's not related to what you mentioned (i.e., being "a real bargain"). If I understood their definition of "found" as a noun correctly, it could be used in a sentence such as: "You'll get 100 bucks and a found for the job".

Perhaps saying "That house was a marvellous/amazing/incredible finding!" would do, but this doesn't sound very natural to me. Maybe someone who knows better can chime in with a good expression. In any case, I strongly believe that "a found" would be incorrect in the phrase you stated.

I don't think so. Merriam-Webster lists only one definition of "found" as a noun: "free food and lodging in addition to wages" and it's not related to what you mentioned (i.e., being "a real bargain"). If I understood their definition of "found" as a noun correctly, it could be used in a sentence such as:

You'll get 100 bucks and a found for the job.

Perhaps saying "That house was a marvelous/amazing/incredible finding!" would do, but this doesn't sound very natural to me. Maybe someone who knows better can chime in with a good expression. In any case, I strongly believe that "a found" would be incorrect in the phrase you stated.

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I don't think so. Merriam-Webster lists only one occurrence of "found" as a noun, and it's not related to what you mentioned (i.e., being "a real bargain"). If I understood their definition of "found" as a noun correctly, it could be used in a sentence such as: "You'll get 100 bucks and a found for the job".

Perhaps saying "That house was a marvellous/amazing/incredible finding!" would do, but this doesn't sound very natural to me. Maybe someone who knows better can chime in with a good expression. In any case, I strongly believe that "a found" would be incorrect in the phrase you stated.