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In your questions, there's a minor emphatic difference. If I were eating yogurt at your house, and I thought it was really delicious, I might ask:

Where do you buy yogurt from?

It places extra emphasis on the fact that I really want to know where to buy this yogurt, probably so I can go there to buy it for myself. However, I could place the same kind of emphasis using "this" and past tense:

Where did you buy this yogurt?

It would also be basically the same to use "at":

Where do you buy yogurt at?

When it comes to the answers, the simple answer is that I would be most likely to simply match the preposition you used in your question. So, if you asked:

Where do you buy yogurt from?

My most likely reply would be:

From Kurosh supermarket.

If you ask, simply:

Where do you buy yogurt?

My most likely reply would be:

At Kurosh supermarket.

The more likely scenario for using "in" might be something like the following:

While I was shopping for pistachios in Kurosh supermarket, I also bought yogurt.

Note that using "from" with "Kurosh supermarket" gives it a slight element of personification. It would be completely incorrect so say "I buy yogurt at Kathy Smith." If you buy something from a person, you must use "from." If you buy it at a place, then you would usually say at, but from feels a bit more affectionate and personal.

In your questions, there's a minor emphatic difference. If I were eating yogurt at your house, and I thought it was really delicious, I might ask:

Where do you buy yogurt from?

It places extra emphasis on the fact that I really want to know where to buy this yogurt, probably so I can go there to buy it for myself. However, I could place the same kind of emphasis using "this" and past tense:

Where did you buy this yogurt?

It would also be basically the same to use "at":

Where do you buy yogurt at?

When it comes to the answers, the simple answer is that I would be most likely to simply match the preposition you used in your question. So, if you asked:

Where do you buy yogurt from?

My most likely reply would be:

From Kurosh supermarket.

If you ask, simply:

Where do you buy yogurt?

My most likely reply would be:

At Kurosh supermarket.

The more likely scenario for using "in" might be something like the following:

While I was shopping for pistachios in Kurosh supermarket, I also bought yogurt.

In your questions, there's a minor emphatic difference. If I were eating yogurt at your house, and I thought it was really delicious, I might ask:

Where do you buy yogurt from?

It places extra emphasis on the fact that I really want to know where to buy this yogurt, probably so I can go there to buy it for myself. However, I could place the same kind of emphasis using "this" and past tense:

Where did you buy this yogurt?

It would also be basically the same to use "at":

Where do you buy yogurt at?

When it comes to the answers, the simple answer is that I would be most likely to simply match the preposition you used in your question. So, if you asked:

Where do you buy yogurt from?

My most likely reply would be:

From Kurosh supermarket.

If you ask, simply:

Where do you buy yogurt?

My most likely reply would be:

At Kurosh supermarket.

The more likely scenario for using "in" might be something like the following:

While I was shopping for pistachios in Kurosh supermarket, I also bought yogurt.

Note that using "from" with "Kurosh supermarket" gives it a slight element of personification. It would be completely incorrect so say "I buy yogurt at Kathy Smith." If you buy something from a person, you must use "from." If you buy it at a place, then you would usually say at, but from feels a bit more affectionate and personal.

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In your questions, there's a minor emphatic difference. If I were eating yogurt at your house, and I thought it was really delicious, I might ask:

Where do you buy yogurt from?

It places extra emphasis on the fact that I really want to know where to buy this yogurt, probably so I can go there to buy it for myself. However, I could place the same kind of emphasis using "this" and past tense:

Where did you buy this yogurt?

It would also be basically the same to use "at":

Where do you buy yogurt at?

When it comes to the answers, the simple answer is that I would be most likely to simply match the preposition you used in your question. So, if you asked:

Where do you buy yogurt from?

My most likely reply would be:

From Kurosh supermarket.

If you ask, simply:

Where do you buy yogurt?

My most likely reply would be:

At Kurosh supermarket.

The more likely scenario for using "in" might be something like the following:

While I was shopping for pistachios in Kurosh supermarket, I also bought yogurt.