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Does the phrase "good day" (greeting) is a natural for native English speakers?

When firstlygreeting people every day it is used to say "good morning" or "good evening" etc. Among the greetings there is another one "good day" (as a greeting!). When I've heard the phrase "good day" firstly it sounded to me weird or foreign as if someone translated it from other language. Today I was told by American English speaker that in the US it is not in use. I'm afraid that in another English speaking countries it is not in use.

Then my question is: does the phrase "good day" (as a greeting) is a natural or common for native English speakers in one of the English speaking countries (such as UK, Canada or Australia)?

Does the phrase "good day" is a natural for native English speakers?

When firstly I've heard the phrase "good day" it sounded to me weird or foreign as if someone translated it from other language. Today I was told by American English speaker that in the US it is not in use. I'm afraid that in another English speaking countries it is not in use.

Then my question is: does the phrase "good day" is a natural or common for native English speakers in one of the English speaking countries (such as UK, Canada or Australia)?

Does the phrase "good day" (greeting) is a natural for native English speakers?

When greeting people every day it is used to say "good morning" or "good evening" etc. Among the greetings there is another one "good day" (as a greeting!). When I've heard the phrase "good day" firstly it sounded to me weird or foreign as if someone translated it from other language. Today I was told by American English speaker that in the US it is not in use. I'm afraid that in another English speaking countries it is not in use.

Then my question is: does the phrase "good day" (as a greeting) is a natural or common for native English speakers in one of the English speaking countries (such as UK, Canada or Australia)?

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When firstly I've heard the phrase "good day" it sounded to me weird or foreign as if someone translated it from other language. Today I was told by American English speaker that in the US it is not in use. I'm afraid that in another English speaking countries it is not in use.

Then my question is: does the phrase "good day" is a natural or common for native English speakers in one of the English speaking countries (such as UK, Canada or Australia)?

When firstly I've heard the phrase "good day" it sounded to me weird or foreign as if someone translated it from other language. Today I was told by American English speaker that in the US it is not in use. I'm afraid that in another English speaking countries it is not in use.

Then my question is: does the phrase "good day" is a natural for native English speakers?

When firstly I've heard the phrase "good day" it sounded to me weird or foreign as if someone translated it from other language. Today I was told by American English speaker that in the US it is not in use. I'm afraid that in another English speaking countries it is not in use.

Then my question is: does the phrase "good day" is a natural or common for native English speakers in one of the English speaking countries (such as UK, Canada or Australia)?

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source | link

Does the phrase "good day" is a natural for native English speakers?

When firstly I've heard the phrase "good day" it sounded to me weird or foreign as if someone translated it from other language. Today I was told by American English speaker that in the US it is not in use. I'm afraid that in another English speaking countries it is not in use.

Then my question is: does the phrase "good day" is a natural for native English speakers?