8 Provided a further illustration, as requested by several users.
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I wonder whether reading the articles of the journals similar to The Economist (including Time, etc) are in a style that make them difficult to flow even for native-readers?

Is the effort to read them is as smooth as other every day text for a native speaker (not a language learner)? For example consider the first paragraph of the following article:

SEPAHUA, a ramshackle town on the edge of Peru's Amazon jungle, nestles in a pocket on the map where a river of the same name flows into the Urubamba. That pocket denotes a tiny patch of legally loggable land sandwiched between four natural reserves, all rich in mahogany and accessible from the town. “Boundaries are on maps,” says a local logger, “maps are only in Lima,” the capital.

As a non-native speaker I can read almost all academic papers in various fields smoothly. It's not the case for The Economist. The above example is not a complex one the context neither in vocabulary. But its sentences are composed in an unnatural way. So the question is: Are any native speakers with a bachelor degree able to flow the Economist as smooth as Wikipedia articles?

There are certainly far better examples to support the question. Feel free to refer, such as the following sentence which is convoluted enough to them. (in particular in human science articles).puzzle even native English speakers:

“That they were mysteriously thwarted by Democrats over the measure for three legislative sessions in a row suggests that some compromise may still be possible, if only behind closed doors—and, perhaps, among the university working groups that right now are hammering out what campus carry—a phrase that almost everyone seems to have a strong view on—actually means.”

https://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21677664-texass-new-campus-carry-law-may-yet-er-backfire-revenge-nerds

I wonder whether reading the articles of the journals similar to The Economist (including Time, etc) are in a style that make them difficult to flow even for native-readers?

Is the effort to read them is as smooth as other every day text for a native speaker (not a language learner)? For example consider the first paragraph of the following article:

SEPAHUA, a ramshackle town on the edge of Peru's Amazon jungle, nestles in a pocket on the map where a river of the same name flows into the Urubamba. That pocket denotes a tiny patch of legally loggable land sandwiched between four natural reserves, all rich in mahogany and accessible from the town. “Boundaries are on maps,” says a local logger, “maps are only in Lima,” the capital.

As a non-native speaker I can read almost all academic papers in various fields smoothly. It's not the case for The Economist. The above example is not a complex one the context neither in vocabulary. But its sentences are composed in an unnatural way. So the question is: Are any native speakers with a bachelor degree able to flow the Economist as smooth as Wikipedia articles?

There are certainly far better examples to support the question. Feel free to refer to them. (in particular in human science articles).

I wonder whether reading the articles of the journals similar to The Economist (including Time, etc) are in a style that make them difficult to flow even for native-readers?

Is the effort to read them is as smooth as other every day text for a native speaker (not a language learner)? For example consider the first paragraph of the following article:

SEPAHUA, a ramshackle town on the edge of Peru's Amazon jungle, nestles in a pocket on the map where a river of the same name flows into the Urubamba. That pocket denotes a tiny patch of legally loggable land sandwiched between four natural reserves, all rich in mahogany and accessible from the town. “Boundaries are on maps,” says a local logger, “maps are only in Lima,” the capital.

As a non-native speaker I can read almost all academic papers in various fields smoothly. It's not the case for The Economist. The above example is not a complex one the context neither in vocabulary. But its sentences are composed in an unnatural way. So the question is: Are any native speakers with a bachelor degree able to flow the Economist as smooth as Wikipedia articles?

There are certainly far better examples to support the question, such as the following sentence which is convoluted enough to puzzle even native English speakers:

“That they were mysteriously thwarted by Democrats over the measure for three legislative sessions in a row suggests that some compromise may still be possible, if only behind closed doors—and, perhaps, among the university working groups that right now are hammering out what campus carry—a phrase that almost everyone seems to have a strong view on—actually means.”

https://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21677664-texass-new-campus-carry-law-may-yet-er-backfire-revenge-nerds

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7 Integrated edits and removed obnoxious answerer filter
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I wonder whether reading the articles of the journals similar to The Economist (including Time, etc) are in a style that make them difficult to flow even for native-readers?

Is the effort to read them is as smooth as other every day text for a native speaker (not a language learner)? For example consider the first paragraph of the following article:

SEPAHUA, a ramshackle town on the edge of Peru's Amazon jungle, nestles in a pocket on the map where a river of the same name flows into the Urubamba. That pocket denotes a tiny patch of legally loggable land sandwiched between four natural reserves, all rich in mahogany and accessible from the town. “Boundaries are on maps,” says a local logger, “maps are only in Lima,” the capital.

update: The question asks about the intelligibility of the magazine for native-speakers. As a non-native speaker I can read almost all academic papers in various fields smoothly. It's not the case for The EconomicsEconomist. The above example is not a complex one the context neither in vocabulary. But its sentences are composed in an unnatural way. So the question is: Are any native speakers with a bachelor degree able to flow the Economist as smooth as Wikipedia articles?

There are certainly far better examples to support the question. Feel free to refer to them. (in particular in human science articles).

update

Please remember that the above paragraph is only an example and this question asks about all The Economics-like journals e.g. Time. If you are not a regular reader of these kind of publications you may not be the person to answer the question.

I wonder whether reading the articles of the journals similar to The Economist are in a style that make them difficult to flow even for native-readers?

Is the effort to read them is as smooth as other every day text for a native speaker? For example consider the first paragraph of the following article:

SEPAHUA, a ramshackle town on the edge of Peru's Amazon jungle, nestles in a pocket on the map where a river of the same name flows into the Urubamba. That pocket denotes a tiny patch of legally loggable land sandwiched between four natural reserves, all rich in mahogany and accessible from the town. “Boundaries are on maps,” says a local logger, “maps are only in Lima,” the capital.

update: The question asks about the intelligibility of the magazine for native-speakers. As a non-native speaker I can read almost all academic papers in various fields smoothly. It's not the case for The Economics. The above example is not a complex one the context neither in vocabulary. But its sentences are composed in an unnatural way. So the question is: Are any native speakers with a bachelor degree able to flow the Economist as smooth as Wikipedia articles?

There are certainly far better examples to support the question. Feel free to refer to them. (in particular in human science articles).

update

Please remember that the above paragraph is only an example and this question asks about all The Economics-like journals e.g. Time. If you are not a regular reader of these kind of publications you may not be the person to answer the question.

I wonder whether reading the articles of the journals similar to The Economist (including Time, etc) are in a style that make them difficult to flow even for native-readers?

Is the effort to read them is as smooth as other every day text for a native speaker (not a language learner)? For example consider the first paragraph of the following article:

SEPAHUA, a ramshackle town on the edge of Peru's Amazon jungle, nestles in a pocket on the map where a river of the same name flows into the Urubamba. That pocket denotes a tiny patch of legally loggable land sandwiched between four natural reserves, all rich in mahogany and accessible from the town. “Boundaries are on maps,” says a local logger, “maps are only in Lima,” the capital.

As a non-native speaker I can read almost all academic papers in various fields smoothly. It's not the case for The Economist. The above example is not a complex one the context neither in vocabulary. But its sentences are composed in an unnatural way. So the question is: Are any native speakers with a bachelor degree able to flow the Economist as smooth as Wikipedia articles?

There are certainly far better examples to support the question. Feel free to refer to them. (in particular in human science articles).

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I wonder whether reading the articles of the journals similar to The Economist are in a style that make them difficult to flow even for native-readers?

Is the effort to read them is as smooth as other every day text for a native speaker? For example consider the first paragraph of the following article:

SEPAHUA, a ramshackle town on the edge of Peru's Amazon jungle, nestles in a pocket on the map where a river of the same name flows into the Urubamba. That pocket denotes a tiny patch of legally loggable land sandwiched between four natural reserves, all rich in mahogany and accessible from the town. “Boundaries are on maps,” says a local logger, “maps are only in Lima,” the capital.

update: The question asks about the intelligibility of the magazine for native-speakers. As a non-native speaker I can read almost all academic papers in various fields smoothly. It's not the case for The Economics. The above example is not a complex one the context neither in vocabulary. But its sentences are composed in an unnatural way. So the question is: Are any native speakers with a bachelor degree able to flow the Economist as smooth as Wikipedia articles?

There are certainly far better examples to support the question. Feel free to refer to them. (in particular in human science articles).

update

Please remember that the above paragraph is only an example and this question asks about all The Economics-like journals e.g. Time. If you are not a regular reader of these kind of publications you may not be the person to answer the question.

I wonder whether reading the articles of the journals similar to The Economist are in a style that make them difficult to flow even for native-readers?

Is the effort to read them is as smooth as other every day text for a native speaker? For example consider the first paragraph of the following article:

SEPAHUA, a ramshackle town on the edge of Peru's Amazon jungle, nestles in a pocket on the map where a river of the same name flows into the Urubamba. That pocket denotes a tiny patch of legally loggable land sandwiched between four natural reserves, all rich in mahogany and accessible from the town. “Boundaries are on maps,” says a local logger, “maps are only in Lima,” the capital.

update: The question asks about the intelligibility of the magazine for native-speakers. As a non-native speaker I can read almost all academic papers in various fields smoothly. It's not the case for The Economics. The above example is not a complex one the context neither in vocabulary. But its sentences are composed in an unnatural way. So the question is: Are any native speakers with a bachelor degree able to flow the Economist as smooth as Wikipedia articles?

There are certainly far better examples to support the question. Feel free to refer to them. (in particular in human science articles).

I wonder whether reading the articles of the journals similar to The Economist are in a style that make them difficult to flow even for native-readers?

Is the effort to read them is as smooth as other every day text for a native speaker? For example consider the first paragraph of the following article:

SEPAHUA, a ramshackle town on the edge of Peru's Amazon jungle, nestles in a pocket on the map where a river of the same name flows into the Urubamba. That pocket denotes a tiny patch of legally loggable land sandwiched between four natural reserves, all rich in mahogany and accessible from the town. “Boundaries are on maps,” says a local logger, “maps are only in Lima,” the capital.

update: The question asks about the intelligibility of the magazine for native-speakers. As a non-native speaker I can read almost all academic papers in various fields smoothly. It's not the case for The Economics. The above example is not a complex one the context neither in vocabulary. But its sentences are composed in an unnatural way. So the question is: Are any native speakers with a bachelor degree able to flow the Economist as smooth as Wikipedia articles?

There are certainly far better examples to support the question. Feel free to refer to them. (in particular in human science articles).

update

Please remember that the above paragraph is only an example and this question asks about all The Economics-like journals e.g. Time. If you are not a regular reader of these kind of publications you may not be the person to answer the question.

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2 Helped OP fetch the content they refer to and put it in the question. OP owes me for the porter service
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