4 added 360 characters in body
source | link

A rather reliable rule of thumb is as follows, although there are always exceptions.

TheseThe letters -(i)an in these endings are pronounced as -[consonant]-/ən/ (one, so as one syllable):

-sian
-cian
-tian
-gian

So it depends on the letter that comes before -ian. Other -ian endings are pronounced as -/ɪən/ (two syllables) or *-/jən/: the difference between these two pronunciations is often hard to hear.

Another way to put it is as follows. If the sound of the preceding consonant changes because of the -i-, that means -ian should be pronounced in a way where you can't hear -i- as a separate sound. So if -s- is pronounced as /ʒ/ rather than /s/ or /z/, -sian is pronounced as -/ʒən/. The same applies if -c- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /s/ (→ -/ʃən/), or if -t- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /t/ (→ -/ʃən/). This does not apply to -g-, though.

The same rule usually applies to -ion, -ial, -ious, and similar suffixes with -i-[vowel]-, mutatis mutandis.


Legend for the International Phonetic Alphabet:

  • ʃ = sh as in English sheep
  • ʒ = j as in French jeu, and -si- as in English Asian
  • ə = a as in English an, and e as in the (the sound is called schwa)

A rather reliable rule of thumb is as follows, although there are always exceptions.

These endings are pronounced as -[consonant]-/ən/ (one syllable):

-sian
-cian
-tian
-gian

So it depends on the letter that comes before -ian. Other -ian endings are pronounced as -/ɪən/ (two syllables) or *-/jən/: the difference between these two pronunciations is often hard to hear.

Another way to put it is as follows. If the sound of the preceding consonant changes, that means -ian should be pronounced in a way where you can't hear -i- as a separate sound. So if -s- is pronounced as /ʒ/ rather than /s/ or /z/, -sian is pronounced as -/ʒən/. The same applies if -c- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /s/ (→ -/ʃən/), or if -t- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /t/ (→ -/ʃən/). This does not apply to -g-, though.

The same rule applies to -ion, -ial, -ious, and similar suffixes with -i-[vowel]-, mutatis mutandis.

A rather reliable rule of thumb is as follows, although there are always exceptions.

The letters -(i)an in these endings are pronounced as -/ən/, so as one syllable:

-sian
-cian
-tian
-gian

So it depends on the letter that comes before -ian. Other -ian endings are pronounced as -/ɪən/ (two syllables) or -/jən/: the difference between these two pronunciations is often hard to hear.

Another way to put it is as follows. If the sound of the preceding consonant changes because of the -i-, that means -ian should be pronounced in a way where you can't hear -i- as a separate sound. So if -s- is pronounced as /ʒ/ rather than /s/ or /z/, -sian is pronounced as -/ʒən/. The same applies if -c- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /s/ (→ -/ʃən/), or if -t- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /t/ (→ -/ʃən/). This does not apply to -g-, though.

The same rule usually applies to -ion, -ial, -ious, and similar suffixes with -i-[vowel]-, mutatis mutandis.


Legend for the International Phonetic Alphabet:

  • ʃ = sh as in English sheep
  • ʒ = j as in French jeu, and -si- as in English Asian
  • ə = a as in English an, and e as in the (the sound is called schwa)
3 added 360 characters in body
source | link

A rather reliable rule of thumb is as follows, although there are always exceptions.

These endings are pronounced as one-[consonant]-/ən/ (one syllable):

-sian
-cian
-tian
-gian

So it depends on the letter that comes before -ian. Other -ian endings are pronounced as two-/ɪən/ (two syllables) or *-/jən/: the difference between these two pronunciations is often hard to hear.

Another way to put it is thus: ifas follows. If the sound of the preceding consonant changes, that means -ian should be one syllablepronounced in a way where you can't hear -i- as a separate sound. So if -s- is pronounced as /ʒ/ rather than /s/ or /z/, it's one syllable-sian is pronounced as -/ʒən/. The same applies if -c- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /s/ (→ -/ʃən/), or if -t- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /t/ (→ -/ʃən/). This does not apply to -g-, though.

The same rule applies to -ion, -ial, -ious, and similar suffixes with -i-[vowel]-, mutatis mutandis.

A rather reliable rule of thumb is as follows, although there are always exceptions.

These endings are pronounced as one syllable:

-sian
-cian
-tian
-gian

Other -ian endings are pronounced as two syllables.

Another way to put it is thus: if the sound of the preceding consonant changes, that means -ian should be one syllable. So if -s- is pronounced as /ʒ/ rather than /s/ or /z/, it's one syllable. The same applies if -c- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /s/, or if -t- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /t/. This does not apply to -g-, though.

The same rule applies to -ion, -ial, -ious, and similar suffixes with -i-[vowel]-, mutatis mutandis.

A rather reliable rule of thumb is as follows, although there are always exceptions.

These endings are pronounced as -[consonant]-/ən/ (one syllable):

-sian
-cian
-tian
-gian

So it depends on the letter that comes before -ian. Other -ian endings are pronounced as -/ɪən/ (two syllables) or *-/jən/: the difference between these two pronunciations is often hard to hear.

Another way to put it is as follows. If the sound of the preceding consonant changes, that means -ian should be pronounced in a way where you can't hear -i- as a separate sound. So if -s- is pronounced as /ʒ/ rather than /s/ or /z/, -sian is pronounced as -/ʒən/. The same applies if -c- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /s/ (→ -/ʃən/), or if -t- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /t/ (→ -/ʃən/). This does not apply to -g-, though.

The same rule applies to -ion, -ial, -ious, and similar suffixes with -i-[vowel]-, mutatis mutandis.

2 added 360 characters in body
source | link

A rather reliable rule of thumb is as follows, although there are always exceptions.

These endings are pronounced as one syllable:

-sian
-cian
-tian
-gian

Other -ian endings are pronounced as two syllables.

Another way to put it is thus: if the sound of the preceding consonant changes, that means -ian should be one syllable. So if -s- is pronounced as /ʒ/ rather than /s/ or /z/, it's one syllable. The same applies if -c- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /s/, or if -t- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /t/. This does not apply to -g-, though.

The same rule applies to -ion, -ial, -ious, and similar suffixes with -i-[vowel]-, mutatis mutandis.

A rather reliable rule of thumb is as follows, although there are always exceptions.

These endings are pronounced as one syllable:

-sian
-cian
-tian
-gian

Other -ian endings are pronounced as two syllables.

The same rule applies to -ion and similar suffixes, mutatis mutandis.

A rather reliable rule of thumb is as follows, although there are always exceptions.

These endings are pronounced as one syllable:

-sian
-cian
-tian
-gian

Other -ian endings are pronounced as two syllables.

Another way to put it is thus: if the sound of the preceding consonant changes, that means -ian should be one syllable. So if -s- is pronounced as /ʒ/ rather than /s/ or /z/, it's one syllable. The same applies if -c- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /s/, or if -t- is pronounced as /ʃ/ rather than /t/. This does not apply to -g-, though.

The same rule applies to -ion, -ial, -ious, and similar suffixes with -i-[vowel]-, mutatis mutandis.

1
source | link