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First read this this answer for the grammatical reference: Why is the subject placed in the end of this sentence?


Then try to follow along with your own sentence: B -> A (reverse)

[conjunction] Most important,

[adjunct B] it it turns us against

[subject A] the very entityentity that holds the capacity to address society’s most pressing problems and on which democracy and freedom depend, our own government.


Compare with this simple sentence:

A --> B (ordinary)

His bad manners threw me [subject A]
me off immediately. [manners - subject A] [me - adjunct [adjunct B]

B --> A (reverse)

There was something something in his behaviour that threw me me off immediately, [ adjunct B]

his bad manners. [me - adjunct B] [manners - subject [subject A]

*Notice the subject of something in the first part of the sentence. It does the same job as the word entity in your example.

In English grammar, a delayed subject is a subject that appears at (or near) the end of a sentence, after the main verb. In such cases, the vacant subject position at the beginning is usually filled with a dummy word, such as it, there, or here.

It comes from this article: What Are Delayed Subjects in English Grammar? You can see if that's of any use to you.

First read this this answer for the grammatical reference: Why is the subject placed in the end of this sentence?


Then try to follow along with your own sentence: B -> A (reverse)

[conjunction] Most important,

[adjunct B] it turns us against

[subject A] the very entity that holds the capacity to address society’s most pressing problems and on which democracy and freedom depend, our own government.


Compare with this simple sentence:

A --> B (ordinary)

His bad manners threw me off immediately. [manners - subject A] [me - adjunct B]

B --> A (reverse)

There was something in his behaviour that threw me off immediately, his bad manners. [me - adjunct B] [manners - subject A]

*Notice the subject of something in the first part of the sentence. It does the same job as the word entity in your example.

In English grammar, a delayed subject is a subject that appears at (or near) the end of a sentence, after the main verb. In such cases, the vacant subject position at the beginning is usually filled with a dummy word, such as it, there, or here.

It comes from this article: What Are Delayed Subjects in English Grammar? You can see if that's of any use to you.

First read this this answer for the grammatical reference: Why is the subject placed in the end of this sentence?


Then try to follow along with your own sentence: B -> A (reverse)

[conjunction] Most important,

[adjunct B] it turns us against

[subject A] the very entity that holds the capacity to address society’s most pressing problems and on which democracy and freedom depend, our own government.


Compare with this simple sentence:

A --> B (ordinary)

His bad manners threw [subject A]
me off immediately. [adjunct B]

B --> A (reverse)

There was something in his behaviour that threw me off immediately, [ adjunct B]

his bad manners. [subject A]

*Notice the subject of something in the first part of the sentence. It does the same job as the word entity in your example.

In English grammar, a delayed subject is a subject that appears at (or near) the end of a sentence, after the main verb. In such cases, the vacant subject position at the beginning is usually filled with a dummy word, such as it, there, or here.

It comes from this article: What Are Delayed Subjects in English Grammar? You can see if that's of any use to you.

1
source | link

First read this this answer for the grammatical reference: Why is the subject placed in the end of this sentence?


Then try to follow along with your own sentence: B -> A (reverse)

[conjunction] Most important,

[adjunct B] it turns us against

[subject A] the very entity that holds the capacity to address society’s most pressing problems and on which democracy and freedom depend, our own government.


Compare with this simple sentence:

A --> B (ordinary)

His bad manners threw me off immediately. [manners - subject A] [me - adjunct B]

B --> A (reverse)

There was something in his behaviour that threw me off immediately, his bad manners. [me - adjunct B] [manners - subject A]

*Notice the subject of something in the first part of the sentence. It does the same job as the word entity in your example.

In English grammar, a delayed subject is a subject that appears at (or near) the end of a sentence, after the main verb. In such cases, the vacant subject position at the beginning is usually filled with a dummy word, such as it, there, or here.

It comes from this article: What Are Delayed Subjects in English Grammar? You can see if that's of any use to you.