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I'm a native speaker, but I still remember learning how to write.

From the very beginning, I was taught how to print (i.e. non cursive writing). Cursive, on the other hand, was very briefly taught in fourth grade (when everyone was 9 or 10 years old). My school didn't require us to write in cursive except when we were learning it. As a result, I don't use cursive except for signing my name. It's very, very, very rare that I have to read anything written in cursive so I'm not very good at reading it either.

I went to public school. Catholic schools are notorious for really requiring students to learn and use cursive. The students in my class that used cursive almost always originally went to Catholic school.

From what I've read online, think that cursive is being pushed out of the curriculum for some schools so they have time for things that are more important, but this will heavily depend on the school. See Cursive handwriting is disappearing from public schools for more info. They no longer teach cursive at the school I went to, in fact.


One thing in particular I remember doing when I was little was practicing writing on worksheets like these:

Source

There are different ways letters can be written, and this shows one valid way. Here is one for cursive letters. If you have a laminated sheet you can use dry erase markers on the same sheet over and over again. Some worksheets have sentences for you to trace. Then we practiced on blank sheets (see for example the "handwriting paper" here). The last step is to switch to regular lined paper, imagining the middle dotted line being invisible.

I'm a native speaker, but I still remember learning how to write.

From the very beginning, I was taught how to print (i.e. non cursive writing). Cursive, on the other hand, was very briefly taught in fourth grade (when everyone was 9 or 10 years old). My school didn't require us to write in cursive except when we were learning it. As a result, I don't use cursive except for signing my name. It's very, very, very rare that I have to read anything written in cursive so I'm not very good at reading it either.

I went to public school. Catholic schools are notorious for really requiring students to learn and use cursive. The students in my class that used cursive almost always originally went to Catholic school.

From what I've read online, think that cursive is being pushed out of the curriculum for some schools so they have time for things that are more important, but this will heavily depend on the school. See Cursive handwriting is disappearing from public schools for more info.


One thing in particular I remember doing when I was little was practicing writing on worksheets like these:

Source

There are different ways letters can be written, and this shows one valid way. Here is one for cursive letters. If you have a laminated sheet you can use dry erase markers on the same sheet over and over again. Some worksheets have sentences for you to trace. Then we practiced on blank sheets (see for example the "handwriting paper" here). The last step is to switch to regular lined paper, imagining the middle dotted line being invisible.

I'm a native speaker, but I still remember learning how to write.

From the very beginning, I was taught how to print (i.e. non cursive writing). Cursive, on the other hand, was very briefly taught in fourth grade (when everyone was 9 or 10 years old). My school didn't require us to write in cursive except when we were learning it. As a result, I don't use cursive except for signing my name. It's very, very, very rare that I have to read anything written in cursive so I'm not very good at reading it either.

I went to public school. Catholic schools are notorious for really requiring students to learn and use cursive. The students in my class that used cursive almost always originally went to Catholic school.

From what I've read online, think that cursive is being pushed out of the curriculum for some schools so they have time for things that are more important, but this will heavily depend on the school. See Cursive handwriting is disappearing from public schools for more info. They no longer teach cursive at the school I went to, in fact.


One thing in particular I remember doing when I was little was practicing writing on worksheets like these:

Source

There are different ways letters can be written, and this shows one valid way. Here is one for cursive letters. If you have a laminated sheet you can use dry erase markers on the same sheet over and over again. Some worksheets have sentences for you to trace. Then we practiced on blank sheets (see for example the "handwriting paper" here). The last step is to switch to regular lined paper, imagining the middle dotted line being invisible.

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source | link

I'm a native speaker, but I still remember learning how to write.

From the very beginning, I was taught how to print (i.e. non cursive writing). Cursive, on the other hand, was very briefly taught in fourth grade (when everyone was 9 or 10 years old). My school didn't require us to write in cursive except when we were learning it. As a result, I don't use cursive except for signing my name. It's very, very, very rare that I have to read anything written in cursive so I'm not very good at reading it either.

I went to public school. Catholic schools are notorious for really requiring students to learn and use cursive. The students in my class that used cursive almost always originally went to Catholic school.

From what I've read online, think that cursive is being pushed out of the curriculum for some schools so they have time for things that are more important, but this will heavily depend on the school. See Cursive handwriting is disappearing from public schools for more info.


One thing in particular I remember doing when I was little was practicing writing on worksheets like these:

Source

There are different ways letters can be written, and this shows one valid way. Here is one for cursive letters. If you have a laminated sheet you can use dry erase markers on the same sheet over and over again. Some worksheets have sentences for you to trace. Then we practiced on blank sheets (see for example the "handwriting paper" here). The last step is to switch to regular lined paper, imagining the middle dotted line being invisible.