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terms for general phrases and more specific phrases confirmingattesting to them

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terms for each member of a setgeneral phrases and for the descriptor of a setmore specific phrases confirming them

Every piece of equipment in the tarmac had some failureEvery piece of equipment on the tarmac had some failure: some boarding stairs were missing stairssome boarding stairs missed some stairs, some carts had no wheelssome carts had no wheels, and some aircraft had no enginessome aircraft had no engines.

There was some disorder in the class: some students were chatting, some were doing the homework, and yet some were sleeping at their desks.

In general, people were not happy: some were merely stern, some were resentful and some were almost mad.

Mammals are those animals that feed their young with milk: cows, tigers, dogs, rabbits.

What would be the idiomatic terms hereterm for each of the statement preceding the colon ("Every piece of equipment had some failure"in the examples above, each such statement is put in italics) and for the each of the following threephrase separated by commas (put in bold)?

terms for each member of a set and for the descriptor of a set

Every piece of equipment in the tarmac had some failure: some boarding stairs were missing stairs, some carts had no wheels, and some aircraft had no engines.

What would be the idiomatic terms here for the statement preceding the colon ("Every piece of equipment had some failure") and for the following three separated by commas?

terms for general phrases and more specific phrases confirming them

Every piece of equipment on the tarmac had some failure: some boarding stairs missed some stairs, some carts had no wheels, and some aircraft had no engines.

There was some disorder in the class: some students were chatting, some were doing the homework, and yet some were sleeping at their desks.

In general, people were not happy: some were merely stern, some were resentful and some were almost mad.

Mammals are those animals that feed their young with milk: cows, tigers, dogs, rabbits.

What would be the idiomatic term for each of the statement preceding the colon (in the examples above, each such statement is put in italics) and for the each of the following phrase separated by commas (put in bold)?

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Every piece of equipment in the tarmac had some failure: some boarding stairs were missing stairs, some carts had no wheels, and some aircraft had no engines.

Every piece of equipment in the tarmac had some failure: some boarding stairs were missing stairs, some carts had no wheels, and some aircraft had no engines.

What would be the idiomatic terms here for the statement preceding the colon ("Every piece of equipment had some failure") and for the following three separated by commas?

Every piece of equipment in the tarmac had some failure: some boarding stairs were missing stairs, some carts had no wheels, and some aircraft had no engines.

What would be the idiomatic terms here for the statement preceding the colon ("Every piece of equipment had some failure") and for the following three separated by commas?

Every piece of equipment in the tarmac had some failure: some boarding stairs were missing stairs, some carts had no wheels, and some aircraft had no engines.

What would be the idiomatic terms here for the statement preceding the colon ("Every piece of equipment had some failure") and for the following three separated by commas?

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