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Both phrases are correct.

There is a little difference, though. "Out from" means rather 'out from some object' than 'out from some volume'.

According to Merriam-Webster's Dictionary:

out of 

— used as a function word to indicate direction or movement from within to the outside of

// walked out of the room

out of 

— used as a function word to indicate direction or movement from within to the outside of

// walked out of the room

Merriam-Webster's Dictionary doesn't give examples with 'out from' except some idioms.

Compare two examples from Reverso.context.net:

Is government planning to throw usReverso.context.net: out from our homes?

I'm going to throw you out of this house.

Is government planning to throw us out from our homes?

I'm going to throw you out of this house.

Both phrases are correct.

There is a little difference, though. "Out from" means rather 'out from some object' than 'out from some volume'.

According to Merriam-Webster's Dictionary:

out of 

— used as a function word to indicate direction or movement from within to the outside of

// walked out of the room

Merriam-Webster's Dictionary doesn't give examples with 'out from' except some idioms.

Compare two examples from Reverso.context.net:

Is government planning to throw us out from our homes?

I'm going to throw you out of this house.

Both phrases are correct.

There is a little difference, though. "Out from" means rather 'out from some object' than 'out from some volume'.

According to Merriam-Webster's Dictionary:

out of 

— used as a function word to indicate direction or movement from within to the outside of

// walked out of the room

Merriam-Webster's Dictionary doesn't give examples with 'out from' except some idioms.

Compare two examples from Reverso.context.net:

Is government planning to throw us out from our homes?

I'm going to throw you out of this house.

    Post Migrated Here from english.stackexchange.com
1
source | link

Both phrases are correct.

There is a little difference, though. "Out from" means rather 'out from some object' than 'out from some volume'.

According to Merriam-Webster's Dictionary:

out of 

— used as a function word to indicate direction or movement from within to the outside of

// walked out of the room

Merriam-Webster's Dictionary doesn't give examples with 'out from' except some idioms.

Compare two examples from Reverso.context.net:

Is government planning to throw us out from our homes?

I'm going to throw you out of this house.