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In English, it's perfectly fine to say:

I want to buy a beach house.

It's become so common at this point, that most people would think of it as a compound noun—and you'll even find it in some dictionaries that way:

[Collins]

noun
a holiday house overlooking a beach

Some people have even adopted the closed-form word beachhouse.

But it would have originally formed from the noun beach acting as an adjective against the noun house. In other words, beach became an attributive noun.


In general, adjectives come before nouns. But most adjectives are also known to be adjectives, and are not used on their own as nouns.

For example:

I ateIt is a hot meal.
I ateIt is a hot.

Although not as common, the following would alsoat least be understood:

✔ I ate❔ It is a meal hot.

It would be understood because we recognize hot as an adjective. Even though it would not normally come after a noun, and it sounds odd, the meaningmeaning is still clear because we know which is the noun and which is the adjective that is modifying it. (In some constructions, an adjective following a noun sounds natural. For instanceHaving said that, I ate my meal hotit would not normally be phrased in this way.)


With attribute nouns, you take two nouns and use the first one in an adjectival way to modify the second one. But the meaning is only clear because of the order in which they are placed.

In other words, you can't just swap the noun order and assume the resulting compound will have the same meaning.

In this case, beach house means "a holiday house overlooking a beach".

But in contrast, if such a phrase were coined, a house beach would likely mean a beach that has many houses overlooking it.

However, it's not a phrase than anybody has actually coined, so it would be assumed to be a mistake. Even if it weren't assumed to be a mistake, the meaning behind it would be that you wanted to buy an entire beach along with all of its many houses.


So, while I want to buy a house beach may be fine in Korean, there are only two ways of phrasing the same thing in English:

I want to buy a house near the beach.
I want to buy a beach house.

In English, it's perfectly fine to say:

I want to buy a beach house.

It's become so common at this point, that most people would think of it as a compound noun—and you'll even find it in some dictionaries that way:

[Collins]

noun
a holiday house overlooking a beach

Some people have even adopted the closed-form word beachhouse.

But it would have originally formed from the noun beach acting as an adjective against the noun house. In other words, beach became an attributive noun.


In general, adjectives come before nouns. But most adjectives are also known to be adjectives, and are not used on their own as nouns.

For example:

I ate a hot meal.
I ate a hot.

Although not as common, the following would also be understood:

✔ I ate a meal hot.

It would be understood because we recognize hot as an adjective. Even though it would not normally come after a noun, the meaning is still clear because we know which is the noun and which is the adjective that is modifying it. (In some constructions, an adjective following a noun sounds natural. For instance, I ate my meal hot.)


With attribute nouns, you take two nouns and use the first one in an adjectival way to modify the second one. But the meaning is only clear because of the order in which they are placed.

In other words, you can't just swap the noun order and assume the resulting compound will have the same meaning.

In this case, beach house means "a holiday house overlooking a beach".

But in contrast, if such a phrase were coined, a house beach would likely mean a beach that has many houses overlooking it.

However, it's not a phrase than anybody has actually coined, so it would be assumed to be a mistake. Even if it weren't assumed to be a mistake, the meaning behind it would be that you wanted to buy an entire beach along with all of its many houses.


So, while I want to buy a house beach may be fine in Korean, there are only two ways of phrasing the same thing in English:

I want to buy a house near the beach.
I want to buy a beach house.

In English, it's perfectly fine to say:

I want to buy a beach house.

It's become so common at this point, that most people would think of it as a compound noun—and you'll even find it in some dictionaries that way:

[Collins]

noun
a holiday house overlooking a beach

Some people have even adopted the closed-form word beachhouse.

But it would have originally formed from the noun beach acting as an adjective against the noun house. In other words, beach became an attributive noun.


In general, adjectives come before nouns. But most adjectives are also known to be adjectives, and are not used on their own as nouns.

For example:

It is a hot meal.
It is a hot.

Although not as common, the following would at least be understood:

❔ It is a meal hot.

It would be understood because we recognize hot as an adjective. Even though it would not normally come after a noun, and it sounds odd, the meaning is still clear because we know which is the noun and which is the adjective that is modifying it. (Having said that, it would not normally be phrased in this way.)


With attribute nouns, you take two nouns and use the first one in an adjectival way to modify the second one. But the meaning is only clear because of the order in which they are placed.

In other words, you can't just swap the noun order and assume the resulting compound will have the same meaning.

In this case, beach house means "a holiday house overlooking a beach".

But in contrast, if such a phrase were coined, a house beach would likely mean a beach that has many houses overlooking it.

However, it's not a phrase than anybody has actually coined, so it would be assumed to be a mistake. Even if it weren't assumed to be a mistake, the meaning behind it would be that you wanted to buy an entire beach along with all of its many houses.


So, while I want to buy a house beach may be fine in Korean, there are only two ways of phrasing the same thing in English:

I want to buy a house near the beach.
I want to buy a beach house.

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In English, it's perfectly fine to say:

I want to buy a beach house.

It's become so common at this point, that most people would think of it as a compound noun—and you'll even find it in some dictionaries that way:

[Collins]

noun
a holiday house overlooking a beach

Some people have even adopted the closed-form word beachhouse.

But it would have originally formed from the noun beach acting as an adjective against the noun house. In other words, beach became an attributive noun.


In general, adjectives come before nouns. But most adjectives are also known to be adjectives, and are not used on their own as nouns.

For example:

✔ I ate a hot meal.
✘ I ate a hot.

Although not as common, the following would also be understood:

✔ I ate a meal hot.

It would be understood because we recognize hot as an adjective. Even though it would not normally come after a noun, the meaning is still clear because we know which is the noun and which is the adjective that is modifying it. (In some constructions, an adjective following a noun sounds natural. For instance, I ate my meal hot.)


With attribute nouns, you take two nouns and use the first one in an adjectival way to modify the second one. But the meaning is only clear because of the order in which they are placed.

In other words, you can't just swap the noun order and assume the resulting compound will have the same meaning.

In this case, beach house means "a holiday house overlooking a beach".

But in contrast, if such a phrase were coined, a house beach would likely mean a beach that has many houses overlooking it.

However, it's not a phrase than anybody has actually coined, so it would be assumed to be a mistake. Even if it weren't assumed to be a mistake, the meaning behind it would be that you wanted to buy an entire beach along with all of its many houses.


So, while I want to buy a house beach may be fine in Korean, there are only two ways of phrasing the same thing in English:

I want to buy a house near the beach.
I want to buy a beach house.