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Yes, we say

What goes up, must come down.

Also, to suggest it's a good idea to be nice to people when you are successful:

Be careful who you stand on, on your way up, as you will meet them on the way down

In the other direction, to suggest those down will someday rise:

Every dog has his/its day

(Edit) Neither of your examples is in common use (or at least, I've never heard them) and may or may not apply to this situation.

"Every downhilluphill has its uphill"downhill" makes perfect sense, but it's not as idiomatic as "What goes up must come down."

Rather than the inevitable reversal of fortune, "High places have their precipices" implies that success brings great risk. It's more of a warning than a prediction. For example celebrity brings renown, but also scrutiny. A person who is not famous can usually do what they like (within the limits of the law, of course), but a single misstep from a famous person -- or even exposure of past missteps -- can destroy a career and bring a lifetime of shame.

"Every tide has its ebb" implies that the "wave" of good fortune that brings success will eventually subside. Again, I see it as a warning to the successful not to rely on things like good luck or public approval, but instead to think about long-term strategies based on less ephemeral factors.

Yes, we say

What goes up, must come down.

Also, to suggest it's a good idea to be nice to people when you are successful:

Be careful who you stand on, on your way up, as you will meet them on the way down

In the other direction, to suggest those down will someday rise:

Every dog has his/its day

(Edit) Neither of your examples is in common use (or at least, I've never heard them) and may or may not apply to this situation.

"Every downhill has its uphill" makes perfect sense, but it's not as idiomatic as "What goes up must come down."

Rather than the inevitable reversal of fortune, "High places have their precipices" implies that success brings great risk. It's more of a warning than a prediction. For example celebrity brings renown, but also scrutiny. A person who is not famous can usually do what they like, but a single misstep from a famous person -- or even exposure of past missteps -- can destroy a career and bring a lifetime of shame.

"Every tide has its ebb" implies that the "wave" of good fortune that brings success will eventually subside. Again, I see it as a warning to the successful not to rely on things like good luck or public approval, but instead to think about long-term strategies based on less ephemeral factors.

Yes, we say

What goes up, must come down.

Also, to suggest it's a good idea to be nice to people when you are successful:

Be careful who you stand on, on your way up, as you will meet them on the way down

In the other direction, to suggest those down will someday rise:

Every dog has his/its day

(Edit) Neither of your examples is in common use (or at least, I've never heard them) and may or may not apply to this situation.

"Every uphill has its downhill" makes perfect sense, but it's not as idiomatic as "What goes up must come down."

Rather than the inevitable reversal of fortune, "High places have their precipices" implies that success brings great risk. It's more of a warning than a prediction. For example celebrity brings renown, but also scrutiny. A person who is not famous can usually do what they like (within the limits of the law, of course), but a single misstep from a famous person -- or even exposure of past missteps -- can destroy a career and bring a lifetime of shame.

"Every tide has its ebb" implies that the "wave" of good fortune that brings success will eventually subside. Again, I see it as a warning to the successful not to rely on things like good luck or public approval, but instead to think about long-term strategies based on less ephemeral factors.

2 added 862 characters in body
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Yes, we say

What goes up, must come down.

Also, to suggest it's a good idea to be nice to people when you are successful:

Be careful who you stand on, on your way up, as you will meet them on the way down

In the other direction, to suggest those down will someday rise:

Every dog has his/its day

(Edit) Neither of your examples is in common use (or at least, I've never heard them) and may or may not apply to this situation.

"Every downhill has its uphill" makes perfect sense, but it's not as idiomatic as "What goes up must come down."

Rather than the inevitable reversal of fortune, "High places have their precipices" implies that success brings great risk. It's more of a warning than a prediction. For example celebrity brings renown, but also scrutiny. A person who is not famous can usually do what they like, but a single misstep from a famous person -- or even exposure of past missteps -- can destroy a career and bring a lifetime of shame.

"Every tide has its ebb" implies that the "wave" of good fortune that brings success will eventually subside. Again, I see it as a warning to the successful not to rely on things like good luck or public approval, but instead to think about long-term strategies based on less ephemeral factors.

Yes, we say

What goes up, must come down.

Also, to suggest it's a good idea to be nice to people when you are successful:

Be careful who you stand on, on your way up, as you will meet them on the way down

In the other direction, to suggest those down will someday rise:

Every dog has his/its day

Yes, we say

What goes up, must come down.

Also, to suggest it's a good idea to be nice to people when you are successful:

Be careful who you stand on, on your way up, as you will meet them on the way down

In the other direction, to suggest those down will someday rise:

Every dog has his/its day

(Edit) Neither of your examples is in common use (or at least, I've never heard them) and may or may not apply to this situation.

"Every downhill has its uphill" makes perfect sense, but it's not as idiomatic as "What goes up must come down."

Rather than the inevitable reversal of fortune, "High places have their precipices" implies that success brings great risk. It's more of a warning than a prediction. For example celebrity brings renown, but also scrutiny. A person who is not famous can usually do what they like, but a single misstep from a famous person -- or even exposure of past missteps -- can destroy a career and bring a lifetime of shame.

"Every tide has its ebb" implies that the "wave" of good fortune that brings success will eventually subside. Again, I see it as a warning to the successful not to rely on things like good luck or public approval, but instead to think about long-term strategies based on less ephemeral factors.

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source | link

Yes, we say

What goes up, must come down.

Also, to suggest it's a good idea to be nice to people when you are successful:

Be careful who you stand on, on your way up, as you will meet them on the way down

In the other direction, to suggest those down will someday rise:

Every dog has his/its day