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To think in this context is an idiomatic expression used to express surprise, dismay, or ironydismay and thus is not constrained by typical grammar rules about infinitives as subjects.

As a whole, its meaningits meaning is along the lines of

"It's surprising that..." or

"It's shameful that..."

It doesn't mean "Thinking that..." as it would in a sentence like "To think [that] the moon is made of cheese is incorrect."

To think in this context is an idiomatic expression used to express surprise, dismay, or irony and thus is not constrained by typical grammar rules about infinitives as subjects.

As a whole, its meaning is along the lines of

"It's surprising that..." or

"It's shameful that..."

It doesn't mean "Thinking that..." as it would in a sentence like "To think [that] the moon is made of cheese is incorrect."

To think in this context is an idiomatic expression used to express surprise or dismay and thus is not constrained by typical grammar rules about infinitives as subjects.

As a whole, its meaning is along the lines of

"It's surprising that..." or

"It's shameful that..."

It doesn't mean "Thinking that..." as it would in a sentence like "To think [that] the moon is made of cheese is incorrect."

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source | link

To think in this context is an idiomatic expression used to express surprise, dismay, or irony and thus is not constrained by typical grammar rules about infinitives as subjects.

As a whole, its meaning is along the lines of

"It's surprising that..." or

"It's shameful that..."

It doesn't mean "Thinking that..." as it would in a sentence like "To think [that] the moon is made of cheese is incorrect."