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This is very speculative, inferred from book titleI wrote to the author who told me simply it means "Wild plant use by the Woods Cree (Nihithawak) of east-central SaskatchewanSpeak Cree" and.

The following is my tiny amount of understanding a little aboutof Cree variations from the Wikipedia pages and other online resources.

  • I believe Nihithawak means the Cree people, in Woodsth-dialect Cree.
  • Perhaps Nihithawan might be the adjective of these people or its language(ref)
  • Perhaps Nihithawan is an inflection on Speakmeans "Speak Cree", in th-dialect Cree ("I am speaking Cree"?author email) in Woods Cree

Woods Cree is Nīhithawīwin, ᓀᐦᐃᖬᐍᐏᐣ‎ in Woods Cree. (ref)

According to wikipedia,: Cree is syllabic and highly inflected, and comes in a number of dialects, including "th-dialect" and "y-dialect" (ref). Specific toOnly Woods Cree ishas th (written as y syllables modified with a crossbar) and also e has merged with i. (I also see that Cree is sometimes divided into "y-dialect" and "th-dialect" (here).)

So Woods Cree Nihitha- might be Nehiya- in other forms of Cree. Additionally, w is specially marked in Cree (with a dot) and so might possibly get lost in transliterations, or more likely, -wan is a suffix with a particular meaning. 

A Cree dictionary gives some support to this:

  • nehiyawak ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐊᐧᐠ NA the Cree people (EC)
  • nehiyawewin ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ N The Cree language. (MD)

The inflections of Cree include prefixes, infixes, suffixes and can be compound. The dictionary gives two which illustrate the complexity.

  • nehiyawe ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧ VC Speak Cree. (MD)
  • nêhiyawêmototawêw ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᒧᑐᑕᐁᐧᐤ VTA s/he speak Cree to s.o. (CW)

Woods Cree is Nīhithawīwin, ᓀᐦᐃᖬᐍᐏᐣ‎ in Woods Cree. (ref)

This is perhaps aentire question bestis probably better suited to Linguistics SE

This is very speculative, inferred from book title "Wild plant use by the Woods Cree (Nihithawak) of east-central Saskatchewan" and understanding a little about Cree variations from the Wikipedia pages.

  • I believe Nihithawak means the Cree people, in Woods Cree.
  • Perhaps Nihithawan might be the adjective of these people or its language
  • Perhaps Nihithawan is an inflection on Speak Cree ("I am speaking Cree"?) in Woods Cree

According to wikipedia, Cree is syllabic and highly inflected. Specific to Woods Cree is th (written as y syllables modified with a crossbar) and e has merged with i. (I also see that Cree is sometimes divided into "y-dialect" and "th-dialect" (here).)

So Woods Cree Nihitha- might be Nehiya- in other forms of Cree. Additionally, w is specially marked in Cree (with a dot) and so might possibly get lost in transliterations, or more likely, -wan is a suffix with a particular meaning.

A Cree dictionary gives some support to this:

  • nehiyawak ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐊᐧᐠ NA the Cree people (EC)
  • nehiyawewin ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ N The Cree language. (MD)
  • nehiyawe ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧ VC Speak Cree. (MD)
  • nêhiyawêmototawêw ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᒧᑐᑕᐁᐧᐤ VTA s/he speak Cree to s.o. (CW)

Woods Cree is Nīhithawīwin, ᓀᐦᐃᖬᐍᐏᐣ‎ in Woods Cree. (ref)

This is perhaps a question best suited to Linguistics SE

I wrote to the author who told me simply it means "Speak Cree".

The following is my tiny amount of understanding of Cree from Wikipedia pages and other online resources.

  • Nihithawak means the Cree people, in th-dialect Cree (ref)
  • Nihithawan means "Speak Cree", in th-dialect Cree (author email)

Woods Cree is Nīhithawīwin, ᓀᐦᐃᖬᐍᐏᐣ‎ in Woods Cree. (ref)

According to wikipedia: Cree is syllabic and highly inflected, and comes in a number of dialects, including "th-dialect" and "y-dialect" (ref). Only Woods Cree has th (written as y syllables modified with a crossbar) and also e has merged with i.

So Woods Cree Nihitha- might be Nehiya- in other forms of Cree.  

A Cree dictionary gives some support to this:

  • nehiyawak ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐊᐧᐠ NA the Cree people (EC)
  • nehiyawewin ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ N The Cree language. (MD)

The inflections of Cree include prefixes, infixes, suffixes and can be compound. The dictionary gives two which illustrate the complexity.

  • nehiyawe ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧ VC Speak Cree. (MD)
  • nêhiyawêmototawêw ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᒧᑐᑕᐁᐧᐤ VTA s/he speak Cree to s.o. (CW)

This entire question is probably better suited to Linguistics SE

3 added 1 character in body
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This is very speculative, inferred from book title "Wild plant use by the Woods Cree (Nihithawak) of east-central Saskatchewan" and understanding a little about Cree variations from the Wikipedia pages.

  • I believe Nihithawak means the Cree people, in Woods Cree.
  • Perhaps Nihithawan might be the adjective of these people or its language
  • Perhaps Nihithawan is an inflection on Speak Cree ("I am speaking Cree"?) in Woods Cree

According to wikipedia, Cree is syllabic and highly inflected. Specific to Woods Cree is th (written as y syllables modified with a crossbar) and e has merged with i. So (I also see that Cree is sometimes divided into "y-dialect" and "th-dialect" (here).)

So Woods Cree Nihitha- might be Nehiya- in other forms of Cree. Additionally, w is specially marked in Cree (with a dot) and so might possibly get lost in transliterations, or more likely, -wan is a suffix with a particular meaning.

A Cree dictionary gives some support to this:

  • nehiyawak ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐊᐧᐠ NA the Cree people (EC)
  • nehiyawewin ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ N The Cree language. (MD)
  • nehiyawe ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧ VC Speak Cree. (MD)
  • nêhiyawêmototawêw ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᒧᑐᑕᐁᐧᐤ VTA s/he speak Cree to s.o. (CW)

Woods Cree is Nīhithawīwin, ᓀᐦᐃᖬᐍᐏᐣ‎ in Woods Cree. (ref)

I also see that Cree is sometimes divided into "y-dialect" and "th-dialect" (here)

This is perhaps a question best suited to Linguistics SE

This is very speculative, inferred from book title "Wild plant use by the Woods Cree (Nihithawak) of east-central Saskatchewan" and understanding a little about Cree variations from the Wikipedia pages.

  • I believe Nihithawak means the Cree people, in Woods Cree.
  • Perhaps Nihithawan might be the adjective of these people or its language
  • Perhaps Nihithawan is an inflection on Speak Cree ("I am speaking Cree"?) in Woods Cree

According to wikipedia, Cree is syllabic and highly inflected. Specific to Woods Cree is th (written as y syllables modified with a crossbar) and e has merged with i. So Woods Cree Nihitha- might be Nehiya- in other forms of Cree. Additionally, w is specially marked in Cree (with a dot) and so might possibly get lost in transliterations, or more likely, -wan is a suffix with a particular meaning.

A Cree dictionary gives some support to this:

  • nehiyawak ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐊᐧᐠ NA the Cree people (EC)
  • nehiyawewin ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ N The Cree language. (MD)
  • nehiyawe ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧ VC Speak Cree. (MD)
  • nêhiyawêmototawêw ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᒧᑐᑕᐁᐧᐤ VTA s/he speak Cree to s.o. (CW)

Woods Cree is Nīhithawīwin, ᓀᐦᐃᖬᐍᐏᐣ‎ in Woods Cree. (ref)

I also see that Cree is sometimes divided into "y-dialect" and "th-dialect" (here)

This is perhaps a question best suited to Linguistics SE

This is very speculative, inferred from book title "Wild plant use by the Woods Cree (Nihithawak) of east-central Saskatchewan" and understanding a little about Cree variations from the Wikipedia pages.

  • I believe Nihithawak means the Cree people, in Woods Cree.
  • Perhaps Nihithawan might be the adjective of these people or its language
  • Perhaps Nihithawan is an inflection on Speak Cree ("I am speaking Cree"?) in Woods Cree

According to wikipedia, Cree is syllabic and highly inflected. Specific to Woods Cree is th (written as y syllables modified with a crossbar) and e has merged with i. (I also see that Cree is sometimes divided into "y-dialect" and "th-dialect" (here).)

So Woods Cree Nihitha- might be Nehiya- in other forms of Cree. Additionally, w is specially marked in Cree (with a dot) and so might possibly get lost in transliterations, or more likely, -wan is a suffix with a particular meaning.

A Cree dictionary gives some support to this:

  • nehiyawak ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐊᐧᐠ NA the Cree people (EC)
  • nehiyawewin ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ N The Cree language. (MD)
  • nehiyawe ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧ VC Speak Cree. (MD)
  • nêhiyawêmototawêw ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᒧᑐᑕᐁᐧᐤ VTA s/he speak Cree to s.o. (CW)

Woods Cree is Nīhithawīwin, ᓀᐦᐃᖬᐍᐏᐣ‎ in Woods Cree. (ref)

This is perhaps a question best suited to Linguistics SE

2 added 544 characters in body
source | link

This is very speculative, inferred from book title "Wild plant use by the Woods Cree (Nihithawak) of east-central Saskatchewan" and understanding a little about Cree variations from the Wikipedia pages.

  • I believe Nihithawak means the Cree people, in Woods Cree.
  • Perhaps Nihithawan might be the adjective of these people or its language  
  • Perhaps Nihithawan is an inflection on Speak Cree ("I am speaking Cree"?) in Woods Cree

According to wikipedia, Cree is syllabic and highly inflected. Specific to Woods Cree is th (written as y syllables modified with a crossbar) and e has merged with i. So Woods Cree Nihitha- might be Nehiya- in other forms of Cree. Additionally, w is specially marked in Cree (with a dot) and so might possibly get lost in transliterations, or more likely, -wan is a suffix with a particular meaning.

A Cree dictionary gives some support to this:

  • nehiyawak ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐊᐧᐠ NA the Cree people (EC)
  • nehiyawewin ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ N The Cree language. (MD)
  • nehiyawe ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧ VC Speak Cree. (MD)
  • nêhiyawêmototawêw ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᒧᑐᑕᐁᐧᐤ VTA s/he speak Cree to s.o. (CW)

Woods Cree is Nīhithawīwin, ᓀᐦᐃᖬᐍᐏᐣ‎ in Woods Cree. (ref)

I also see that Cree is sometimes divided into "y-dialect" and "th-dialect" (here)

This is perhaps a question best suited to Linguistics SE

This is very speculative, inferred from book title "Wild plant use by the Woods Cree (Nihithawak) of east-central Saskatchewan" and understanding a little about Cree variations from the Wikipedia pages.

  • I believe Nihithawak means the Cree people, in Woods Cree.
  • Perhaps Nihithawan might be the adjective of these people or its language  

According to wikipedia, Cree is syllabic and highly inflected. Specific to Woods Cree is th (written as y syllables modified with a crossbar) and e has merged with i. So Woods Cree Nihitha- might be Nehiya- in other forms of Cree. Additionally, w is specially marked in Cree (with a dot) and so might possibly get lost in transliterations.

A Cree dictionary gives some support to this:

  • nehiyawak ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐊᐧᐠ NA the Cree people (EC)
  • nehiyawewin ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ N The Cree language. (MD)

This is perhaps a question best suited to Linguistics SE

This is very speculative, inferred from book title "Wild plant use by the Woods Cree (Nihithawak) of east-central Saskatchewan" and understanding a little about Cree variations from the Wikipedia pages.

  • I believe Nihithawak means the Cree people, in Woods Cree.
  • Perhaps Nihithawan might be the adjective of these people or its language
  • Perhaps Nihithawan is an inflection on Speak Cree ("I am speaking Cree"?) in Woods Cree

According to wikipedia, Cree is syllabic and highly inflected. Specific to Woods Cree is th (written as y syllables modified with a crossbar) and e has merged with i. So Woods Cree Nihitha- might be Nehiya- in other forms of Cree. Additionally, w is specially marked in Cree (with a dot) and so might possibly get lost in transliterations, or more likely, -wan is a suffix with a particular meaning.

A Cree dictionary gives some support to this:

  • nehiyawak ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐊᐧᐠ NA the Cree people (EC)
  • nehiyawewin ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ N The Cree language. (MD)
  • nehiyawe ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧ VC Speak Cree. (MD)
  • nêhiyawêmototawêw ᓀᐦᐃᔭᐁᐧᒧᑐᑕᐁᐧᐤ VTA s/he speak Cree to s.o. (CW)

Woods Cree is Nīhithawīwin, ᓀᐦᐃᖬᐍᐏᐣ‎ in Woods Cree. (ref)

I also see that Cree is sometimes divided into "y-dialect" and "th-dialect" (here)

This is perhaps a question best suited to Linguistics SE

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