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Since and presentthe perfect tense

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I know that telling "saying:

(A) I am here since six o’clock." OR "I am here since six o’clock. or (B) I was here since six o’clockI was here since six o’clock." 

would sound unidiomatic because of using "since" and its requisite tense which is "presentpresent perfect. E.g. For example:

(C) - I have been here since six o’clockI have been here since six o’clock. But

But I came across another sentence somewhere in a text-booktextbook which caused me to doubt. Is it possible to say:   

(D) - I had been there since six o’clockI had been there since six o’clock. If

If yes, what's the semantic difference ofbetween "C" and "D" or rather, and when shallshould I use each one (I mean "c" and "d".)?

I know that telling "(A) I am here since six o’clock." OR "(B) I was here since six o’clock." would sound unidiomatic because of using "since" and its requisite tense which is "present perfect. E.g. (C) - I have been here since six o’clock. But I came across another sentence somewhere in a text-book which caused me to doubt. Is it possible to say:  (D) - I had been there since six o’clock. If yes, what's the semantic difference of "C" and "D" or rather when shall I use each one (I mean "c" and "d".)

I know that saying:

(A) I am here since six o’clock. or (B) I was here since six o’clock. 

would sound unidiomatic because of using "since" and its requisite tense which is present perfect. For example:

(C) - I have been here since six o’clock.

But I came across another sentence somewhere in a textbook which caused me to doubt. Is it possible to say: 

(D) - I had been there since six o’clock.

If yes, what's the semantic difference between "C" and "D", and when should I use each one?

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