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The phrase "run a mile""run a mile" means:

To try to avoid a situation or a person because you are embarrassed or frightened.

Based on this definition, I wonder if you could let me know whether the following sentence sounds natural and the usage of this verb is correct:

He's completely against marriage. He runs a mile "from" girls when it comes to marriage.

I have visited many web pages which had lots of examples including the phrase, but never found a preposition "from" in even one sentences to be used along with this phrase. It was why I made up a sentence and brought it up in the forum.

Thank you.

The phrase "run a mile" means:

To try to avoid a situation or a person because you are embarrassed or frightened.

Based on this definition, I wonder if you could let me know whether the following sentence sounds natural and the usage of this verb is correct:

He's completely against marriage. He runs a mile "from" girls when it comes to marriage.

I have visited many web pages which had lots of examples including the phrase, but never found a preposition "from" in even one sentences to be used along with this phrase. It was why I made up a sentence and brought it up in the forum.

Thank you.

The phrase "run a mile" means:

To try to avoid a situation or a person because you are embarrassed or frightened.

Based on this definition, I wonder if you could let me know whether the following sentence sounds natural and the usage of this verb is correct:

He's completely against marriage. He runs a mile "from" girls when it comes to marriage.

I have visited many web pages which had lots of examples including the phrase, but never found a preposition "from" in even one sentences to be used along with this phrase. It was why I made up a sentence and brought it up in the forum.

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The phrase "run a mile""run a mile" means:

To try to avoid a situation or a person because you are embarrassed or frightened.

Based on this definition, I wonder if you could let me know whether the following sentence sounds natural and the usage of this verb is correct:

He's completely against marriage. He runs a mile "from" girls when it comes to marriage.

I have visited many web pages which had lots of examples including the phrase, but never found a preposition "from" in even one sentences to be used along with this phrase. It was why I made up a sentence and brought it up in the forum.

Thank you.

The phrase "run a mile" means:

To try to avoid a situation or a person because you are embarrassed or frightened.

Based on this definition, I wonder if you could let me know whether the following sentence sounds natural and the usage of this verb is correct:

He's completely against marriage. He runs a mile "from" girls when it comes to marriage.

I have visited many web pages which had lots of examples including the phrase, but never found a preposition "from" in even one sentences to be used along with this phrase. It was why I made up a sentence and brought it up in the forum.

Thank you.

The phrase "run a mile" means:

To try to avoid a situation or a person because you are embarrassed or frightened.

Based on this definition, I wonder if you could let me know whether the following sentence sounds natural and the usage of this verb is correct:

He's completely against marriage. He runs a mile "from" girls when it comes to marriage.

I have visited many web pages which had lots of examples including the phrase, but never found a preposition "from" in even one sentences to be used along with this phrase. It was why I made up a sentence and brought it up in the forum.

Thank you.

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The usage of "run a mile" in a sentence

The phrase "run a mile" means:

To try to avoid a situation or a person because you are embarrassed or frightened.

Based on this definition, I wonder if you could let me know whether the following sentence sounds natural and the usage of this verb is correct:

He's completely against marriage. He runs a mile "from" girls when it comes to marriage.

I have visited many web pages which had lots of examples including the phrase, but never found a preposition "from" in even one sentences to be used along with this phrase. It was why I made up a sentence and brought it up in the forum.

Thank you.