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I can't seem to find a suitable way to describe how I pronounce "sixth" using IPA. Perhaps someone who's more adept with IPA can help with that.

A little introduction:


When we put together sounds, like the "ks" of "x", we generally have to use different (active) mouth parts for each sound, otherwise itthey won't work (those I guess being. The active mouth parts would be the lips, the teeth, the tip of the tongue, the back of the tongue, the epiglottis and finally the glottis, in that order from front to back).

The "k" sound uses the back of the tongue to hit the velum (hence "velar stop"), and can easily go with "s", which uses the tongue and teeth, the two together forming the "x" sound. On the other hand, both "s" and "θ" use both the tongue and teeth, and thereas such don't really work together in general, since neither teeth nor tongue can be in multiple positions at the same time. There are a few ways to pronounce either, and as such don't really work together inhowever general descriptions of the pronunciations could be written as follows:

s is pronounced when air is made to flow through a small space between teeth, tongue and or alveolar.

θ is pronounced when air is forced out over the tongue which is pressed on or placed near to the top teeth, either under or behind (or if you want to be a little silly, in front).

  • (I can't say for sure, but it seems in British English it is usually behind, whereas in American or Caribbean English, it is usually under)

Despite this, although it is impossible to make the two distinct "s" and "θ" sounds together, I find I use a sound that can be considered in between the two when I say "sixth". In order to do so, simply press (not touch) your tongue behind your top teeth near to or touching the alveolar (the part where your teeth meet your back gum), and push the air over the tongue (you should feel the air on your back gums and tip of tongue, not around the sides). This sound, at least to me, is close enough to both "s" and "θ" to be used here.

Diagram of Mouth, location to place tongue highlightedDiagram 1 of Mouth. Location to place tongue highlightedDiagram 2 of Mouth. Configuration of tongue Fig.1 Location to place tongue highlighted    |    Fig.2 Configuration of tongue

I can't seem to find a suitable way to describe how I pronounce "sixth" using IPA. Perhaps someone who's more adept with IPA can help with that.

A little introduction:


When we put together sounds, like the "ks" of "x", we generally have to use different mouth parts for each sound, otherwise it won't work (those I guess being the lips, teeth, tip of tongue, back of tongue, epiglottis and glottis, in that order front to back).

The "k" sound uses the back of the tongue to hit the velum (hence "velar stop"), and can easily go with "s", which uses the tongue and teeth, together forming "x". On the other hand, both "s" and "θ" use the tongue and teeth, and there are a few ways to pronounce either, and as such don't really work together in general:

s is pronounced when air is made to flow through a small space between teeth, tongue and or alveolar.

θ is pronounced when air is forced out over the tongue which is pressed on or placed near to the top teeth, either under or behind (or if you want to be a little silly, in front).

  • (I can't say for sure, but it seems in British English it is usually behind, whereas in American or Caribbean English, it is usually under)

Despite this, although it is impossible to make the two distinct "s" and "θ" sounds together, I find I use a sound that can be considered in between the two when I say "sixth". In order to do so, simply press your tongue behind your top teeth near to or touching the alveolar (the part where your teeth meet your back gum), and push the air over the tongue (you should feel the air on your back gums and tip of tongue, not around the sides). This sound, at least to me, is close enough to both "s" and "θ" to be used here.

Diagram of Mouth, location to place tongue highlighted

I can't seem to find a suitable way to describe how I pronounce "sixth" using IPA. Perhaps someone who's more adept with IPA can help with that.

A little introduction:


When we put together sounds, like the "ks" of "x", we generally have to use different (active) mouth parts for each sound, otherwise they won't work. The active mouth parts would be the lips, the teeth, the tip of the tongue, the back of the tongue, the epiglottis and finally the glottis, in that order from front to back.

The "k" sound uses the back of the tongue to hit the velum (hence "velar stop"), and can easily go with "s", which uses the tongue and teeth, the two together forming the "x" sound. On the other hand, both "s" and "θ" use both the tongue and teeth, and as such don't really work together in general, since neither teeth nor tongue can be in multiple positions at the same time. There are a few ways to pronounce either, however general descriptions of the pronunciations could be written as follows:

s is pronounced when air is made to flow through a small space between teeth, tongue and or alveolar.

θ is pronounced when air is forced out over the tongue which is pressed on or placed near to the top teeth, either under or behind (or if you want to be a little silly, in front).

  • (I can't say for sure, but it seems in British English it is usually behind, whereas in American or Caribbean English, it is usually under)

Despite this, although it is impossible to make the two distinct "s" and "θ" sounds together, I find I use a sound that can be considered in between the two when I say "sixth". In order to do so, simply press (not touch) your tongue behind your top teeth near to or touching the alveolar (the part where your teeth meet your back gum), and push the air over the tongue (you should feel the air on your back gums and tip of tongue, not around the sides). This sound, at least to me, is close enough to both "s" and "θ" to be used here.

Diagram 1 of Mouth. Location to place tongue highlightedDiagram 2 of Mouth. Configuration of tongue Fig.1 Location to place tongue highlighted    |    Fig.2 Configuration of tongue

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I can't seem to find a suitable way to describe how I pronounce "sixth" using IPA. Perhaps someone who's more adept with IPA can help with that.

A little introduction:


When we put together sounds, like the "ks" of "x", we generally have to use different mouth parts for each sound, otherwise it won't work (those I guess being the lips, teeth, tip of tongue, back of tongue, epiglottis and glottis, in that order front to back).

The "k" sound uses the back of the tongue to hit the velum (hence "velar stop"), and can easily go with "s", which uses the tongue and teeth, together forming "x". On the other hand, both "s" and "θ" use the tongue and teeth, and there are a few ways to pronounce either, and as such don't really work together in general:

s is pronounced when air is made to flow through a small space between teeth, tongue and or alveolar.

θ is pronounced when air is forced out over the tongue which is pressed on or placed near to the top teeth, either under or behind (or if you want to be a little silly, in front).

  • (I can't say for sure, but it seems in British English it is usually behind, whereas in American or Caribbean English, it is usually under)

Despite this, although it is impossible to make the two distinct "s" and "θ" sounds together, I find I use a sound that can be considered in between the two when I say "sixth". In order to do so, simply press your tongue behind your top teeth near to or touching the alveolar (the part where your teeth meet your back gum), and push the air over the tongue (you should feel the air on your back gums and tip of tongue, not around the sides). This sound, at least to me, is close enough to both "s" and "θ" to be used here.

Diagram of Mouth, location to place tongue highlighted

I can't seem to find a suitable way to describe how I pronounce "sixth" using IPA. Perhaps someone who's more adept with IPA can help with that.

A little introduction:


When we put together sounds, like the "ks" of "x", we generally have to use different mouth parts for each sound, otherwise it won't work (those I guess being the lips, teeth, tip of tongue, back of tongue, epiglottis and glottis, in that order front to back).

The "k" sound uses the back of the tongue to hit the velum (hence "velar stop"), and can easily go with "s", which uses the tongue and teeth, together forming "x". On the other hand, both "s" and "θ" use the tongue and teeth, and there are a few ways to pronounce either, and as such don't really work together in general:

s is pronounced when air is made to flow through a small space between teeth, tongue and or alveolar.

θ is pronounced when air is forced out over the tongue which is pressed on or placed near to the top teeth, either under or behind (or if you want to be a little silly, in front).

  • (I can't say for sure, but it seems in British English it is usually behind, whereas in American or Caribbean English, it is usually under)

Despite this, although it is impossible to make the two distinct "s" and "θ" sounds together, I find I use a sound that can be considered in between the two when I say "sixth". In order to do so, simply press your tongue behind your top teeth near to or touching the alveolar, and push the air over the tongue. This sound, at least to me, is close enough to both "s" and "θ" to be used here.

Diagram of Mouth, location to place tongue highlighted

I can't seem to find a suitable way to describe how I pronounce "sixth" using IPA. Perhaps someone who's more adept with IPA can help with that.

A little introduction:


When we put together sounds, like the "ks" of "x", we generally have to use different mouth parts for each sound, otherwise it won't work (those I guess being the lips, teeth, tip of tongue, back of tongue, epiglottis and glottis, in that order front to back).

The "k" sound uses the back of the tongue to hit the velum (hence "velar stop"), and can easily go with "s", which uses the tongue and teeth, together forming "x". On the other hand, both "s" and "θ" use the tongue and teeth, and there are a few ways to pronounce either, and as such don't really work together in general:

s is pronounced when air is made to flow through a small space between teeth, tongue and or alveolar.

θ is pronounced when air is forced out over the tongue which is pressed on or placed near to the top teeth, either under or behind (or if you want to be a little silly, in front).

  • (I can't say for sure, but it seems in British English it is usually behind, whereas in American or Caribbean English, it is usually under)

Despite this, although it is impossible to make the two distinct "s" and "θ" sounds together, I find I use a sound that can be considered in between the two when I say "sixth". In order to do so, simply press your tongue behind your top teeth near to or touching the alveolar (the part where your teeth meet your back gum), and push the air over the tongue (you should feel the air on your back gums and tip of tongue, not around the sides). This sound, at least to me, is close enough to both "s" and "θ" to be used here.

Diagram of Mouth, location to place tongue highlighted

1
source | link

I can't seem to find a suitable way to describe how I pronounce "sixth" using IPA. Perhaps someone who's more adept with IPA can help with that.

A little introduction:


When we put together sounds, like the "ks" of "x", we generally have to use different mouth parts for each sound, otherwise it won't work (those I guess being the lips, teeth, tip of tongue, back of tongue, epiglottis and glottis, in that order front to back).

The "k" sound uses the back of the tongue to hit the velum (hence "velar stop"), and can easily go with "s", which uses the tongue and teeth, together forming "x". On the other hand, both "s" and "θ" use the tongue and teeth, and there are a few ways to pronounce either, and as such don't really work together in general:

s is pronounced when air is made to flow through a small space between teeth, tongue and or alveolar.

θ is pronounced when air is forced out over the tongue which is pressed on or placed near to the top teeth, either under or behind (or if you want to be a little silly, in front).

  • (I can't say for sure, but it seems in British English it is usually behind, whereas in American or Caribbean English, it is usually under)

Despite this, although it is impossible to make the two distinct "s" and "θ" sounds together, I find I use a sound that can be considered in between the two when I say "sixth". In order to do so, simply press your tongue behind your top teeth near to or touching the alveolar, and push the air over the tongue. This sound, at least to me, is close enough to both "s" and "θ" to be used here.

Diagram of Mouth, location to place tongue highlighted