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Is the use of "egg on" common in colloquial American Englishcommon in colloquial American English? Is it used? I looked up its use on Ngram, but it dosen't hint at the actual usage, so I just felt like asking.

To urge someone to do something, often something mischievous. A noun or pronoun can be used between "egg" and "on."

Trevor's never been in trouble before, so I'm sure his friends egged him on to start the food fight.

Source:The Free Dictionary.

Will "talk into" be more common or is it equally common (in that sense, natural and famous enough to be used in everyday English)

Is the use of "egg on" common in colloquial American English? Is it used? I looked up its use on Ngram, but it dosen't hint at the actual usage, so I just felt like asking.

To urge someone to do something, often something mischievous. A noun or pronoun can be used between "egg" and "on."

Trevor's never been in trouble before, so I'm sure his friends egged him on to start the food fight.

Source:The Free Dictionary.

Will "talk into" be more common or is it equally common (in that sense, natural and famous enough to be used in everyday English)

Is the use of "egg on" common in colloquial American English? Is it used? I looked up its use on Ngram, but it dosen't hint at the actual usage, so I just felt like asking.

To urge someone to do something, often something mischievous. A noun or pronoun can be used between "egg" and "on."

Trevor's never been in trouble before, so I'm sure his friends egged him on to start the food fight.

Source:The Free Dictionary.

Will "talk into" be more common or is it equally common (in that sense, natural and famous enough to be used in everyday English)

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source | link

Egg someone on to do something

Is the use of "egg on" common in colloquial American English? Is it used? I looked up its use on Ngram, but it dosen't hint at the actual usage, so I just felt like asking.

To urge someone to do something, often something mischievous. A noun or pronoun can be used between "egg" and "on."

Trevor's never been in trouble before, so I'm sure his friends egged him on to start the food fight.

Source:The Free Dictionary.

Will "talk into" be more common or is it equally common (in that sense, natural and famous enough to be used in everyday English)